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    • Member Info
      • Native Language:
      • French
      • Home Country:
      • Canada
      • Current Location:
      • Canada

    • Join Date: Nov 2007
    • Posts: 74
    #1

    Up, Down and over.

    In a previous post I was asking if we could independently use "up" or "down" when expressing directions:
    In was informed we could. However would it carry the same meaning whether we say "up" or "down"?

    • They walk up to find their seat / why can’t we say “they walk down the aisle to find their seat” ? ¨.Does it have the same meaning?
    • They walk down the passage way (?) Could we not say: “the walk up the passage way”? Does it have the same meaning?
    • The cars are driving down the snowy street . Could we not say: “the cars are driving up the snowy street? (In cases where the street is neither going up nor down) Does it have the same meaning?
    • She walks up to the front door. Could we not say:
    a)“She walks down to the front door”? or
    b) "She walks over to the front door"? Does it have the same meaning?

    • Member Info
      • Native Language:
      • English
      • Home Country:
      • England
      • Current Location:
      • England

    • Join Date: Aug 2009
    • Posts: 203
    #2

    Re: Up, Down and over.

    Hello,

    I would agree that the ups/downs are interchangeable and independent of geography - certainly for the first three. I'd normally expect to walk up to a front door rather than down but not entirely sure why that's to be preferred other than it's common usage. If the slope down to a front door was very steep then it may be preferable to use down.

    Walking down to or over to are as far as I can see much the same.

    As an aside, here in the UK it's generally accepted that correct usage says one 'goes UP to London' rather than down, but those of us outside the capital see this as unnecessarily London centric and happily use down as well.

    HTH

    • Member Info
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      • French
      • Home Country:
      • Canada
      • Current Location:
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    • Posts: 74
    #3

    Re: Up, Down and over.

    Thank you for your valuable answer.
    Bearing this in mind, would you say that: "the father walks down the aisle with the bride" is just as equally acceptable às : "the father walks up the aile with the bride"?

    • Member Info
      • Native Language:
      • English
      • Home Country:
      • England
      • Current Location:
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    • Join Date: Aug 2009
    • Posts: 203
    #4

    Re: Up, Down and over.

    Hi,

    In my experience, in the UK you're more likely to hear the phrase 'down the aisle' and hence I'd say it's more acceptable rather than equally acceptable.

    Rgds

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