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  1. #1

    Beware/beware of?

    What is the difference in meaning or use? I know both are used, but I cant figure out when to use beware without preposition 'of'.

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    #2

    Re: Beware/beware of?

    The common usage is beware of. I have only heard the of deleted in poetry or stylized prose: "Beware the Jabberwok, my son" "Beware his waspish wit."

  2. #3

    Re: Beware/beware of?

    I always go to the British National Corpus first, when I am not sure about these things. This is what I found:

    Beware being heavy-handed with flour. (from Country living magazine)

    The lesson for Australia, and indeed for Britain, is to beware a Labor Party that has dropped nationalisation, but not intervention, from its agenda. (The Economist)

    SIR --; I agree with George Walden that David Mellor should beware acting hastily against the BBC for its election coverage (article, April 13). (Daily Telegraph)

    Beware the hazards of inactivity! (New Scientist)


    I am not trying to prove you wrong but do these fit in the category of poetic language?

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    #4

    Re: Beware/beware of?

    I'm sorry. I am guilty, once again, of linguistic regionalism. The consistent use of beware of is a custom of American English, not a rule of any English. The of appears to be optional, but to my provincial ears, those sentences sound somewhat stilted.

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