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      • Native Language:
      • Chinese
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      • China
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      • China

    • Join Date: Oct 2009
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    #1

    would do well to

    Dear all,

    How should I understand the underlined below?
    How should I paraphrase them?

    Thanks in advance.

    Eartha

    Anyone who is overly impressed with the apparent resilience of China today would do well to read a new book by two bankers who have worked there for many years, Carl Walter and Fraser Howie. “Red Capitalism” avoids the standard approach to Chinese analysis, which uses mounds of macroeconomic data that even Chinese regulators acknowledge are replete with flaws. Instead, the authors examine how China’s financial system has grown from pretty much nothing three decades ago into the dynamic, bewildering and possibly doomed set of institutions that fill the landscape today.

  1. Route21's Avatar
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      • England
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    • Join Date: Nov 2010
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    #2

    Re: would do well to

    Hi Eartha

    Quote Originally Posted by Eartha View Post

    Anyone who is overly impressed with the apparent resilience of China today would do well to read a new book by two bankers who have worked there for many years, Carl Walter and Fraser Howie. “Red Capitalism” avoids the standard approach to Chinese analysis, which uses mounds of macroeconomic data that even Chinese regulators acknowledge are replete with flaws. Instead, the authors examine how China’s financial system has grown from pretty much nothing three decades ago into the dynamic, bewildering and possibly doomed set of institutions that fill the landscape today.
    As a NES, but not a teacher or specialist in economics:

    1. "would do well to" = "would be well advised to" (i.e. "really should" or "really ought to")
    2. My understanding of the words, as written, would be that the standard approach to Chinese financial analysis uses lots of macro-data (i.e. broad brush generalisations- not taking into account the real key factors involved). These generalisations have many flaws, as even the Chinese regulators acknowledge.
    3. "fill the landscape" - there are so many new financial institutions - wherever you look you will see them.

    Hope this helps - but am open to other interpretations.

    R21

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