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    • Member Info
      • Native Language:
      • Chinese
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      • China
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      • China

    • Join Date: Aug 2010
    • Posts: 695
    #1

    Which one is correct?

    Hi,

    I got three terms to describe a door that can prevent the thief from coming in, but it seems not to be correct or idiomatic, here are the three terms:

    Burglar-proof door
    anti-theft door
    security door

    I wonder which one is correct and idiomatic to use?

    Thanks a lot

  1. NikkiBarber's Avatar
    • Member Info
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      • Denmark
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      • United States

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    #2

    Re: Which one is correct?

    I am not an English teacher and I am not aware of a common word for such a door, but it would be okay to say that the door is burglarproof, which simply means that the door is secured against burglary.

  2. Senior Member
    Interested in Language
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      • Native Language:
      • Serbo-Croatian
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      • Bosnia Herzegovina
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      • Bosnia Herzegovina

    • Join Date: Nov 2007
    • Posts: 844
    #3

    Re: Which one is correct?

    /A learner/

    Quote Originally Posted by Silverobama View Post
    Hi,

    I've got three terms to describe the door that can prevent a thief from breaking and entering into, but they seem not to be correct or idiomatic. Here are the three terms:

    Burglar-proof door
    anti-theft door
    security door

    I wonder which ones could be correct and idiomatic to use?

    Thanks a lot
    .

    into or in?

    Thanks

  3. bhaisahab's Avatar
    • Member Info
      • Native Language:
      • British English
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      • England
      • Current Location:
      • Ireland

    • Join Date: Apr 2008
    • Posts: 25,615
    #4

    Re: Which one is correct?

    Quote Originally Posted by e2e4 View Post
    /A learner/



    .

    into or in?

    Thanks
    If you are going to use "into" it needs an object, "the house", for example.

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