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    #1

    a slip of the tongue

    "Do like tongue twisters?"

    "Yes. But I'm always having a slip of the tongue." Is it correct?

  1. Barb_D's Avatar
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    #2

    Re: a slip of the tongue

    I frequently makes slips of the tongue.
    I'm not a teacher, but I write for a living. Please don't ask me about 2nd conditionals, but I'm a safe bet for what reads well in (American) English.

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    #3

    Re: a slip of the tongue

    I'm sure it was just a slip of the finger for Barb, but I'm sure she meant to type:

    "I frequently make slips of the tongue."

    As for me, I would probably respond with "Yes, but my tongue always gets tangled up."

  2. Barb_D's Avatar
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    #4

    Re: a slip of the tongue

    Oops!

    I agree that your version is better. To me, a slip of the tongue is when you say something you didn't mean to say but it's still a real word that usually fits the context. Some can get you into trouble. I used to call my children by the dog's name because I'd had the dog a lot longer. That was a slip of the tongue.

    When you say tongue twisters, you often don't say real words, or they are real words but not at all in the right context. Getting your tongue all tangled up is a much better way to say that!
    I'm not a teacher, but I write for a living. Please don't ask me about 2nd conditionals, but I'm a safe bet for what reads well in (American) English.

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