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    #1

    future continous

    Hi there,
    What is the difference among the following sentence?

    1. What time are you meeting Ann tomorrow?
    2. What time are you going to meet Ann tomorrow?
    3. What time will you meet Ann tomorrow?

    Tks
    simon

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    #2

    Re: future continous

    Quote Originally Posted by simon1234 View Post
    Hi there,
    What is the difference among the following sentence?

    1. What time are you meeting Ann tomorrow?
    2. What time are you going to meet Ann tomorrow?
    3. What time will you meet Ann tomorrow?

    Tks
    simon
    Hello,

    I am not English or a teacher, but there is not difference in this case maybe with a context.

    Bye,

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    #3

    Re: future continous

    /A learner/

    Quote Originally Posted by simon1234 View Post
    Hi there,
    What is the difference among the following sentence?

    1. What time are you meeting Ann tomorrow? (The meeting's arranged)
    2. What time are you going to meet Ann tomorrow? (the same, intention)
    3. What time will you meet Ann tomorrow? (Not acceptable for me)

    Tks
    simon
    These two additional sentences are acceptable for me as well.
    What time will you be meeting Ann tomorrow? (the answer could be "from 11 to 12")
    Will you have been meeting Ann by 12 o'clock tomorrow? (Yes, I'll have.)
    Owing to the fact that I am a learner all of this could be wrong.
    So, let us wait for a teacher.

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    #4

    Re: future continous

    /A learner/

    Quote Originally Posted by The French View Post
    Hello,

    I am (not) neither English nor a teacher, but there is no(t) difference in this case; maybe with a context.

    Bye,
    I suggest, ask a question to a teacher.

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    #5

    Re: future continous

    I would use those interchangeably.
    I'm not a teacher, but I write for a living. Please don't ask me about 2nd conditionals, but I'm a safe bet for what reads well in (American) English.

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    #6

    Re: future continous

    Hi there,
    Thanks
    what is the difference between the following:

    1. We'll be leaving tomorrow.
    2. We are leaving tomorrow.

    tks
    simon

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    #7

    Re: future continous

    ***Neither a teacher nor a native speaker.***

    You should use the 1st sentence when you want to connect several actions that will happen in the future.
    We'll be leaving tomorrow when you're going to the cinema.
    Both actions happen in the same time.
    -> If you want to see us tomorrow, don't go to the cinema.

    We are leaving tomorrow.
    It's a clear and definitive statement that you are leaving tomorrow.
    Not more and not less.

    Cheers!

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    #8

    Re: future continous

    Quote Originally Posted by Nightmare85 View Post
    ***Neither a teacher nor a native speaker.***

    We'll be leaving tomorrow when you're going to the cinema.
    Both actions happen at the same time.
    -> If you want to see us tomorrow, don't go to the cinema. That's not necessarily true. We could see you before we go to the cinema.

    Cheers!
    2006
    Last edited by 2006; 19-Dec-2010 at 05:56. Reason: correct who's going to the cinema

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    #9

    Re: future continous

    If you want to say goodbye to us, don't go to the cinema.
    Better?
    Last edited by Nightmare85; 19-Dec-2010 at 02:32.

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    #10

    Re: future continous

    1. What time are you meeting Ann tomorrow?
    2. What time are you going to meet Ann tomorrow?
    3. What time will you meet Ann tomorrow?


    Barb-D: I would use those interchangeably.
    So would many speakers. If that had been the first and only answer, no more would need to be said. However, there may be some confusion as to which of the other posts are correct, so Iíll attempt to clarify matters.

    e2e4: two additional sentences are acceptable for me as well.
    What time will you be meeting Ann tomorrow?
    (the answer could be "from 11 to 12")
    Will you have been meeting Ann by 12 o'clock tomorrow?(Yes, I'll have.)
    The first of e2e4ís sentences could be used by most speakers interchangeably with the three original ones. E2e4ís bracketed answer, suggesting that the act of meeting necessarily has duration, is very unlikely. E2e4ís second sentence is a theoretically possible construction, but highly unlikely to be uttered. The non-progressive Will you have met Ann by 12 is less unlikely. In either case, the answer would be Yes, I will not Yes, Iíll have.


    nightmare 85: You should use the 1st sentence when you want to connect several actions that will happen in the future. We'll be leaving tomorrow when you're going to the cinema.Not necessarily

    We are leaving tomorrow. It's a clear and definitive statement that you are leaving tomorrow. Not more and not less. Other ways of expressing the future can also be clear and definitive.


    Bearing in mind that many of the ways of expressing the future can be used interchangeably with very little practical difference in meaning, we can note these common ways:

    1. Present Simple: I meet Ann at 12. A scheduled/timetabled situation.
    2. Present Progressive/Continuous: I am meeting Ann at 12. An arrangement.
    3. BE+going+to: I am going to meet Ann at 12. There is present evidence for this.
    4. WILL/ĎLL: I will/Iíll meet Ann at 12. Certainty, or an offer.
    5. WILL/íLL+BE+ing-form: I will/Iíll be meeting Ann at 12. = It just happens that this future situation will occur. This is sometimes referred to as Ďthe casualí future.

    The construction used in #4 is called the future (simple) tense in some books.
    The construction used in #5 is called the future continuous (or future progressive) in some books. This is often used to denote an action begun before a future time and continuing after that time: Iíll be sitting in the pub at 12 tomorrow.

    For a much more detailed look at ways of expressing the future, try: http://www.gramorak.com/Articles/Future.pdf

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