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    #1

    to possess / to be in a possession of

    Is the latter more official?

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    #2

    Re: to possess / to be in a possession of

    to possess means to be in possession of

    I possess multiple copies of this report.


  1. 5jj's Avatar
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    #3

    Re: to possess / to be in a possession of

    If you possess something you own it, it is your property.

    If you are in possession (not in a possession) of something, it is more likely that you have it on or about you at the time spoken of. It may or may not belong to you.

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    #4

    Re: to possess / to be in a possession of

    I probably need to elaborate.

    I know it's the same, but for example in regards to tickets or passport they always say, "you must be in a possession of a valid ticket/passport" not just "you must possess", that's why the question.

    A follow up question: what's the difference between "in possession" and "in a possession"?

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    #5

    Re: to possess / to be in a possession of

    Quote Originally Posted by alikim View Post
    I know it's the same, but for example in regards to tickets or passport they always say, "you must be in a possession of a valid ticket/passport" not just "you must possess", that's why the question.
    In this situation, you must not simply own one, but actually have it with you.

    A follow up question: what's the difference between "in possession" and "in a possession"? The correct expression is 'in possession of', without an article.
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    #6

    Re: to possess / to be in a possession of

    thanks!

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