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      • Bulgarian
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    #1

    cut the ground from under somebody

    Dear teachers,

    Would you tell me whether I am right about my interpretation of the expressions in bold in the following sentence?

    His cordial agreement with all I said cut the ground from under my feet. (W. S. Maugham, “The Moon and Sixpence”)

    cut the ground from under somebody = cut the ground from somebody’s feet = spoil somebody’s plan

    Thanks for your efforts.

    Regards,

    V

  1. 5jj's Avatar
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      • British English
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      • England
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      • Czech Republic

    • Join Date: Oct 2010
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    #2

    Re: cut the ground from under somebody

    Quote Originally Posted by vil View Post
    cut the ground from under somebody = cut the ground from somebody’s feet = spoil somebody’s plan, usually suddenly.
    5

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