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    #1

    double perfect infinitive

    "I would have liked to have seen her the party. But she said she was not coming." Is it correct? Is this kind of grammatical counstruction used in speech?
    Last edited by ostap77; 20-Dec-2010 at 22:09.

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    #2

    Re: double perfect infinitive

    [QUOTE=ostap77;692236]"I would have liked to have seen hert at a party. But she said she was not coming." Is it correct? Is this kind of grammatical construction used in speech?[QUOTE]
    "I would have liked to have seen her at the party." This is correct, but it would be better followed by "But she didn't come."

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    #3

    Re: double perfect infinitive

    [QUOTE=bhaisahab;692239][QUOTE=ostap77;692236]"I would have liked to have seen hert at a party. But she said she was not coming." Is it correct? Is this kind of grammatical construction used in speech?
    "I would have liked to have seen her at the party." This is correct, but it would be better followed by "But she didn't come."
    "I would have liked to have seen......"

    OR

    "I would like to have seen..........."

    I assume there would be no difference in meaning. Are they equally used in conversation? Doesn't the first one sound more sophisticated?

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    #4

    Re: double perfect infinitive

    A pedant would argue that these are possible and correct:

    1. I wish (now) that I had seen her at the party (in the past).
    I would like to have seen her.

    2. I wished (when I was at the party, in the past) to see her at the party.
    I would have liked to see her.

    3. I wished (when I was at the party, in the past) that I had seen her before the party (at an earlier past time).
    I would have liked to have seen her.

    Many people use the situation#3 construction in situation #1 and/or situation #2. The pedant would consider this to be incorrect.

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    #5

    Re: double perfect infinitive

    /A learner/

    Quote Originally Posted by ostap77 View Post
    "I would have liked to have seen her the party. But she said she was not coming." Is it correct? Is this kind of grammatical counstruction is used in speech?
    "I would have liked to have seen her at the party." is perfectly correct.
    In my opinion, "But she didn't come" wouldn't be better solution to be the second sentence because the perfect conditional "would have liked" tell us exactly that the event wasn't fulfilled. (No need for the second sentence of this type)
    In addition, and in my opinion, the thread starter's second sentence doesn't match the first one.
    (I told her that I liked to see her at the party but she said she wouldn't come?)
    Also there is no doubling of the perfect infinitive in the sentence.
    "to have seen" is the only one perfect infinitive used.

    Last edited by e2e4; 20-Dec-2010 at 15:19.

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    #6

    Re: double perfect infinitive

    Quote Originally Posted by e2e4 View Post
    "I would have liked to have seen her at the party." is perfectly correct. Well some would argue that it is not 'perfectly' correct.

    In my opinion, "But she didn't come" wouldn't be better solution to be the second sentence because the perfect conditional "would have liked" tells us exactly that the event wasn't fulfilled. (No need for the second sentence of this type). There is no need, but it's very natural.

    In addition, and in my opinion, the thread starter's second sentence doesn't match the first one. Both the Op's and bhaisahab's sentences are possible follow-ons.
    (I told her that I liked to see her at the party but she said she wouldn't come?) That one is possible, but only in such a situation as the reporting of:
    I: I like to see you at the party. [= I think that your presence at the party (which we hold at regular intervals) is desirable]
    She: I won't come! [= I refuse to attend the party (which is taking place soon)]

    Also there is no doubling of the perfect infinitive in the sentence. "to have seen" is the only one perfect infinitive used. True.
    5

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    #7

    Re: double perfect infinitive


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    #8

    Re: double perfect infinitive

    I have just had an interesting experience.(Well, I thought it was interesting.) A CouchSurfing guest who was due to arrive tomorrow had to cancel. I had been looking forward to meeting her, and wanted to let her know this. I know that in practice any of the three utterances below are possible, but I wonder what the pedant would say.

    1. I would have liked to meet you.
    2. I would like to have met you.
    3. I would have liked to have met you.

    I imagine, if we assume an unuttered if your flight had not been cancelled, then we are dealing with a counterfactual situation, so we should use I would have liked. And, as the meeting is not anterior to the liking, then it must be to meet rather than to have met. So, the pedantís choice, IMO, would be #1.

    Interesting that an utterance such as I would have liked to meet you which would, without full context, probably be taken to refer to a past disappointment about a past non-meeting in fact refers to a future disappointment about a future non-meeting.

    I think.

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    #9

    Re: double perfect infinitive

    Pedants of the world, unite. You have nothing to lose but your πέδας. (I might have got the accent wrong, but the Greek for 'chains' is the root of 'pedant'. Neat, huh?)

    b

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    #10

    Re: double perfect infinitive

    /A learner/

    Quote Originally Posted by fivejedjon View Post
    5
    Originally Posted by e2e4
    "I would have liked to have seen her at the party." is perfectly correct. Well some would argue that it is not 'perfectly' correct.
    In my, learner's opinion,"to have seen" means here "having her seen" what means that the party is over (fulfilled).
    "to see her" wouldn't work for me because "to see" is time indefinite. Actually it is something that is to fulfill. But "to see her" had to be finished before my thinking (of my wish) in the simple past.
    The party had happened in the deep past before my thinking of what I had liked.
    In my opinion, "But she didn't come" wouldn't be better solution to be the second sentence because the perfect conditional "would have liked" tells us exactly that the event wasn't fulfilled. (No need for the second sentence of this type). There is no need, but it's very natural.I think that more "very natural" would be........but , well, as you know, it wasn't like that.
    In addition, and in my opinion, the thread starter's second sentence doesn't match the first one. Both the Op's and bhaisahab's sentences are possible follow-ones.(is this correct correction?)
    (I told her that I liked to see her at the party but she said she wouldn't come?) That one is possible, but only in such a situation as the reporting of:
    I: I like to see you at the party. [= I think that your presence at the party (which we hold at regular intervals) is desirable]
    She: I won't come! [= I refuse to attend the party (which is taking place soon)]I suppose she would tell it more politely and probably say "I am afraid I can't come".

    Also there is no doubling of the perfect infinitive in the sentence. "to have seen" is the only one perfect infinitive used. True.Thank you.

    Thanks

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