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  1. AH020387's Avatar
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    #1

    Bipolar

    What does 'bipolar' mean in the following sentence:


    'The weather here (in this town) is very bipolar.'


    Does it mean the weather is moody i.e. it changes suddenly and without warning

    OR

    Does it mean there only two seasons i.e. summer and winter

    ?

  2. 5jj's Avatar
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    #2

    Re: Bipolar

    Without further context, I'd say it could mean either. It's not a way of describing weather that I have met before.

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    #3

    Post Re: Bipolar

    (I am not a teacher, although I have been a volunteer beginning ESL teacher in the past).

    Quote Originally Posted by AH020387 View Post
    What does 'bipolar' mean in the following sentence:

    'The weather here (in this town) is very bipolar.'

    Does it mean the weather is moody i.e. it changes suddenly and without warning

    OR

    Does it mean there only two seasons i.e. summer and winter?
    Yes, it's true that both meanings are possible.

    Sometimes (at least in informal AmE), "bipolar" is used to mean "having violent mood swings" when a writer/speaker wants to be humorous in describing continuing noticeable changes in something or someone. (Of course, one would not want to use that term to joke when describing someone who actually does suffer from a serious Bipolar Disorder--for example, cyclothymia). Since the sentence uses the word "very," I think this humorous usage is more likely, and the weather having "two poles" seems less likely, since "very" would add nothing in the second scenario.

  3. Raymott's Avatar
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    #4

    Re: Bipolar

    Quote Originally Posted by AH020387 View Post
    What does 'bipolar' mean in the following sentence:


    'The weather here (in this town) is very bipolar.'


    Does it mean the weather is moody i.e. it changes suddenly and without warning

    OR

    Does it mean there only two seasons i.e. summer and winter

    ?
    It probably is an analogy to the mental disorder, but 'bipolar' means other things (anything with two poles is bipolar). So, even in the days when Bipolar Disorder was called Manic Depression, this sentence could still be understood as meaning that the weather was either at one extreme or the other.
    But this doesn't explain what the poles are: hot and cold, rainy and dry, sunny and cloudy ...

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