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    #1

    Can sure be used with might, could and may??

    1) My first question would be, where do we put sure in the sentence like

    "It sure is going to be a great party." OK? Can I put it "It is sure going to be...."?

    2) Is it OK to put "well" in the sentence like this "It might well have been a great party if you had planed it thoroughly." ?

    3) Can we use "sure" similar to the previous context "It sure might have been...." or "It might sure have been......"?

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    #2

    Re: Can sure be used with might, could and may??

    1) My first question would be, where do we put sure in the sentence like

    "It sure is going to be a great party." OK? Can I put it "It is sure going to be...."?


    3) Can we use "sure" similar to the previous context "It sure might have been...." or "It might sure have been......"?


    You should use the adverb form of sure, surely, in the above examples, and it can go before or after is.


    2) Is it OK to put "well" in the sentence like this "It might well have been a great party if you had planed it thoroughly." ?

    Yes, this usage is consistent with standard English.
    Last edited by mykwyner; 27-Dec-2010 at 00:00. Reason: addition

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    #3

    Re: Can sure be used with might, could and may??

    Quote Originally Posted by ostap77 View Post
    1) My first question would be, where do we put sure in the sentence like

    "It sure is going to be a great party." OK? Can I put it "It is sure going to be...."?

    2) Is it OK to put "well" in the sentence like this "It might well have been a great party if you had planed it thoroughly." ?

    3) Can we use "sure" similar to the previous context "It sure might have been...." or "It might sure have been......"?

    ********** NOT A TEACHER **********


    Ostap,


    Regarding your question No. 3, I wish to cite these sentences from

    Professor George O. Curme's A Grammar of the English Language

    (Essex, Connecticut: Verbatim, 1983):

    He must surely have seen him./ He must have surely seen him./

    He surely must have seen him.

    The professor says that all three positions are correct.

    *****

    Regarding your question No. 1, I have checked my books and the

    Web. Remember that you must be very careful when reading

    answers from a non-teacher such as I.

    (1) Surely, it is going to be a great party.

    (2) It is going to be a great party, surely.

    As I understand it, you would say these if you were not sure and

    were looking for confirmation (that is, you want someone else to

    agree with your opinion). For example: Mr. X has lived in the

    United States for 50 years. Surely, he must speak English!!!

    (You think that it is true, but you hope someone will answer:

    "Yes, you are right! When he came to this country 50 years ago,

    he started studying English and now speaks it fluently.")

    (3) It is surely going to be a great party.

    I believe that No. 3 is the sentence that many books and teachers

    would say follows the "rule." The rule says:

    Adverbs such as "surely" go after the verb "to be."

    (4) It surely is going to be a great party.

    Sentence No.4 breaks the rule, but that is OK. There are always

    exceptions to the rule. If you put an adverb such as "surely"

    before the verb "to be," that means that you want to stress

    (emphasize or pronounce strongly/loudly) the form of "to be."

    Tom: Is it going to be a great party?

    You: It surely IS (going to be a great party)!!!

    Probably learners should follow the rule and produce sentences such as

    No. 3. After they really understand English, they can then use

    Nos. 1, 2, and 4.


    THANK YOU

    P.S. As the teacher told you in the first post, native speakers

    often use "sure" in sentences No. 3 and 4. If you wish to speak

    "correct" English, it is better to use "surely." By the way, it is

    not possible to use "sure" in sentences Nos. 1 and 2!!!

    (English is surely a difficult language!)

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    #4

    Re: Can sure be used with might, could and may??

    There is a bit of confusion here regarding which verb is being used. In the example by The Parser the verb is not to be but to go. Hence it does not 'break' the rule.

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