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    #1

    plough one's way

    Dear teachers,

    Would you tell me whether I am right about my interpretation of the expression in bold in the following sentence?

    He ploughed his way along, head down. (J. Galsworthy, “The White Monkey”

    plough one’s way = move forward slowly

    Thanks for your efforts.

    Regards,

    V

  1. Mister Micawber's Avatar
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    #2

    Re: plough one's way

    Yes, slowly and forcefully, as against some resistance or bearing some weight.

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    #3

    Re: plough one's way

    In my poor opinion "plough one’s way " and "fight one's way forward" differ from one another.

    V.

  2. apex2000's Avatar
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    #4

    Re: plough one's way

    "fight one's way forward" - relevance?
    They do differ but how? Why introduce this without any explanation and when it has nothing to do with the original question?

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    #5

    Re: plough one's way

    Hi apex2000,

    I beg your pardon for the arising plying of my rambling questions?

    In my auxiliary literature is referred that the mentioned above two expressions resemble each other. That is anything unacceptable for my comprehension. I began to doubt in the reliability of my dictionary which prompted me to seek the aid of you - all-knowing English teachers.

    I hope you would help me out of this thigh spot.

    V.

  3. apex2000's Avatar
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    #6

    Re: plough one's way

    Hello Vil. If my memory serves me correctly then you have been a useful member here for some time. That being so I was surprised to read your comment; and without any explanation.

    Your dictionary is not helpful in this instance. To plough one's way through something indicates being laborious, slow, steady in undertaking a task or making any progress in direction. To fight one's way forward is more suggestive of not simply against human or other opposition but that the task requires more than simply making slow progress. You might plough your way through a very muddy field but fight your way against a blizzard that is 'trying to force you back'.

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