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Thread: /j/

  1. devonpham1998's Avatar
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    #1

    Question /j/

    I have a question. Why the /j/ in "university" /ju:nɪ'vɜ:sətɪ/ is pronunced "J" but the /j/ in "onion" /'ʌnjən/ is pronunced "i"? Why "onion" is not /'ʌnɪən/?

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    #2

    Re: /j/

    What do you mean by "J" and "i"? What is the difference?

  3. devonpham1998's Avatar
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    #3

    Re: /j/

    Quote Originally Posted by birdeen's call View Post
    What do you mean by "J" and "i"? What is the difference?
    "j" and "i" are totally different!

  4. 5jj's Avatar
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    #4

    Re: /j/

    Quote Originally Posted by devonpham1998 View Post
    "j" and "i" are totally different!
    Well, no, not totally different.In English /j/ is a glide from from an approximate position of /i(:)/ to the following vowel.

    As regards your first question: "I have a question. Why the /j/ in "university" /ju:nɪ'vɜ:sətɪ/ is pronunced "J" but the /j/ in "onion" /'ʌnjən/ is pronunced "i"? Why "onion" is not /'ʌnɪən/?"
    /'ʌnjən/ represents the way we pronounce it, with two syllables, and a /j/ sound; /'ʌnɪən/ would have three syllables and there would be a /j/ glide between /i/ and /.
    Last edited by 5jj; 28-Dec-2010 at 09:51.

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    #5

    Re: /j/

    Quote Originally Posted by devonpham1998 View Post
    "j" and "i" are totally different!
    The letters "j" and "i" are different. The phonemes /j/ and /i/ are different too.

    Did you mean the phonemes?

    Why did you capitalize "J"?

    Do you really mean the phoneme /i/ or do you mean /ɪ/?

    Do you think the sounds in "university" and in "onion" are different or do you think they're the same?

  6. lauralie2's Avatar
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    #6

    Re: /j/

    Quote Originally Posted by devonpham1998 View Post
    I have a question. Why the /j/ in "university" /ju:nɪ'vɜ:sətɪ/ is pronunced "J" but the /j/ in "onion" /'ʌnjən/ is pronunced "i"? Why "onion" is not /'ʌnɪən/?
    The symbol /j/ is pronounced like the letter <y> as is in yellow. The symbol /j/ could also be represented as /y/;e.g., [y]university, on[y]ion.

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    #7

    Re: /j/

    The vowel /ɪ/, when followed by another vowel is usually written as /j/ (to better indicate that there is no pause between the two vowels)

    /ənɪən/ = /ənjən/ (onion)
    /loɪɚ/ = /lojɚ/ (lawyer)
    /ˈneɪˌseɪɚ/= /ˈneɪˌsejɚ/ (naysayer)

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    #8

    Re: /j/

    Quote Originally Posted by thatone View Post
    The vowel /ɪ/, when followed by another vowel is usually written as /j/ (to better indicate that there is no pause between the two vowels)

    /ənɪən/ = /ənjən/ (onion)
    No.
    The semi-vowel /j/ is considered a distinct phoneme, as are the vowels /i(:)/ and /I/
    /ʌnɪən/ is not the same as /ʌnjən/

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    #9

    Re: /j/

    But what is the difference between /i/ and /I/?

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    #10

    Re: /j/

    /i:/ (long /i/) is the sound that you hear in "feet".

    /I/ is the sound that you hear in "fit".

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