Results 1 to 7 of 7
    • Member Info
      • Native Language:
      • English
      • Home Country:
      • Canada
      • Current Location:
      • Switzerland

    • Join Date: Aug 2009
    • Posts: 1,676
    #1

    Notify

    Is it correct to use "notify" without an object? For example, "any defects must be notified in writing within 10 days."

    Thanks!

  1. Barb_D's Avatar
    • Member Info
      • Native Language:
      • American English
      • Home Country:
      • United States
      • Current Location:
      • United States

    • Join Date: Mar 2007
    • Posts: 19,215
    #2

    Re: Notify

    No.
    You notify a person. That sentence needs to say who needs to be notified about the defect.
    I'm not a teacher, but I write for a living. Please don't ask me about 2nd conditionals, but I'm a safe bet for what reads well in (American) English.

  2. apex2000's Avatar
    • Member Info
      • Native Language:
      • English
      • Home Country:
      • UK
      • Current Location:
      • Wales

    • Join Date: Nov 2005
    • Posts: 785
    #3

    Re: Notify

    I disagree. Within the NHS, for example, infectious diseases must be notified to the Minister for Health immediately. This is done in writing as the Minister cannot take every phone call and may not even be available.
    There are many instances where written notification is specifically required, particularly within national and local government.

  3. Barb_D's Avatar
    • Member Info
      • Native Language:
      • American English
      • Home Country:
      • United States
      • Current Location:
      • United States

    • Join Date: Mar 2007
    • Posts: 19,215
    #4

    Re: Notify

    Okay, then I will revise to say that it's not okay in American usage. You would notify the CDC about the infectious diseases, not notify the diseases.
    I'm not a teacher, but I write for a living. Please don't ask me about 2nd conditionals, but I'm a safe bet for what reads well in (American) English.

  4. NikkiBarber's Avatar
    • Member Info
      • Native Language:
      • Danish
      • Home Country:
      • Denmark
      • Current Location:
      • United States

    • Join Date: Dec 2010
    • Posts: 93
    #5

    Re: Notify

    Quote Originally Posted by apex2000 View Post
    I disagree. Within the NHS, for example, infectious diseases must be notified to the Minister for Health immediately. This is done in writing as the Minister cannot take every phone call and may not even be available.
    There are many instances where written notification is specifically required, particularly within national and local government.
    I don't think that Barb_D meant that you have to notify a person in person. Of course it is perfectly possible and acceptable to notify someone of something in writing.
    Barb_D only wrote that "notify" cannot be used without an object. The object can be one person or a group of people, but someone must be on the receiving end of the notification. However, I have just learned that this doesn't apply to all forms of English.
    I am not sure how reliable dictionary.com is, but the second entry under "notify" says that the verb can be used without an object in British English: http://dictionary.reference.com/browse/notify


    I have never heard of this before and "notify" without an object doesn't sound natural to me, but I'd like to know if this is common among British speakers?

    • Member Info
      • Native Language:
      • English
      • Home Country:
      • Canada
      • Current Location:
      • Switzerland

    • Join Date: Aug 2009
    • Posts: 1,676
    #6

    Re: Notify

    Quote Originally Posted by apex2000 View Post
    I disagree. Within the NHS, for example, infectious diseases must be notified to the Minister for Health immediately. This is done in writing as the Minister cannot take every phone call and may not even be available.
    There are many instances where written notification is specifically required, particularly within national and local government.
    You may have misunderstood my question. You say that you disagree and then you use notify with an object (Minister for Health).

  5. apex2000's Avatar
    • Member Info
      • Native Language:
      • English
      • Home Country:
      • UK
      • Current Location:
      • Wales

    • Join Date: Nov 2005
    • Posts: 785
    #7

    Re: Notify

    Yes, I see I should have been more specific.
    There are many occasions in the UK where a notice in writing calls for notification to be sent to a specific office holder. That does not mean that the office holder in person must have and deal with the notification; there will be staff who will handle the notification in other departments depending on the content of the notification. In reality we are notifying a department or organisation as required.
    In the OP that statement would be followed by details of where the notification should be sent.

Similar Threads

  1. plz notify mistakes for me thanks
    By adnanmushtaq in forum Ask a Teacher
    Replies: 1
    Last Post: 24-Jul-2010, 12:49

Bookmarks

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •