Page 1 of 2 1 2 LastLast
Results 1 to 10 of 14
  1. Mehrgan's Avatar
    • Member Info
      • Native Language:
      • Persian
      • Home Country:
      • Iran
      • Current Location:
      • Iran

    • Join Date: Apr 2009
    • Posts: 1,742
    #1

    Question Any expression for the dead?

    Hi,
    Could anyone please tell me if there is any informal term or expression which is used either before or after the name of a person who's passed away? Is that common to use such terms in daily speech to show our respect for that person?


    Thanks.

  2. Barb_D's Avatar
    • Member Info
      • Native Language:
      • American English
      • Home Country:
      • United States
      • Current Location:
      • United States

    • Join Date: Mar 2007
    • Posts: 19,221
    #2

    Re: Any expression for the dead?

    The word is "late."

    Her late husband.
    The late Jim Morrison.
    I'm not a teacher, but I write for a living. Please don't ask me about 2nd conditionals, but I'm a safe bet for what reads well in (American) English.

    • Member Info
      • Native Language:
      • English
      • Home Country:
      • United States
      • Current Location:
      • United States

    • Join Date: Dec 2009
    • Posts: 6,332
    #3

    Re: Any expression for the dead?

    Quote Originally Posted by Mehrgan View Post
    Hi,
    Could anyone please tell me if there is any informal term or expression which is used either before or after the name of a person who's passed away? Is that common to use such terms in daily speech to show our respect for that person?


    Thanks.

    ***** NOT A TEACHER *****


    Mehrgan,


    I believe that sometimes we also use the word departed,

    especially (as one dictionary tells me) if that person has

    died recently:

    My dear departed mother, Marion.


    THANK YOU

  3. Mehrgan's Avatar
    • Member Info
      • Native Language:
      • Persian
      • Home Country:
      • Iran
      • Current Location:
      • Iran

    • Join Date: Apr 2009
    • Posts: 1,742
    #4

    Re: Any expression for the dead?

    Thanks to both dear posters. Helpful examples!

    Best!

    • Member Info
      • Native Language:
      • English
      • Home Country:
      • England
      • Current Location:
      • England

    • Join Date: Jun 2010
    • Posts: 24,502
    #5

    Re: Any expression for the dead?

    Another useful word is deceased.

    This site gives many examples of its use:

    "deceased" - Google News

    Rover

  4. Mehrgan's Avatar
    • Member Info
      • Native Language:
      • Persian
      • Home Country:
      • Iran
      • Current Location:
      • Iran

    • Join Date: Apr 2009
    • Posts: 1,742
    #6

    Re: Any expression for the dead?

    Quote Originally Posted by Rover_KE View Post
    Another useful word is deceased.

    This site gives many examples of its use:

    "deceased" - Google News

    Rover

    Ta! Please, could you tell me which one does NOT sound odd in everyday informal usage? (Especially as a way to show respect both for the people who've lost them, and the person passed away.)

  5. BobK's Avatar
    • Member Info
      • Native Language:
      • English
      • Home Country:
      • UK
      • Current Location:
      • UK

    • Join Date: Jul 2006
    • Posts: 16,038
    #7

    Re: Any expression for the dead?

    Quote Originally Posted by Mehrgan View Post
    Ta! Please, could you tell me which one does NOT sound odd in everyday informal usage? (Especially as a way to show respect both for the people who've lost them, and the person passed away.)
    'The late [lamented]' is commonly used colloquially. 'The departed' sounds to me rather formal - and a bit politically-correct - likely to be used by funeral directors trying to sell silk-lined coffins . 'Deceased' is formal - administrative or forensic. Also you can just - colloquially - name the dead person and add something like 'who has left us' or 'who left us N years ago' (More formally, you could say 'passed on' or 'passed away' instead of 'left'. The Am English for this is just 'passed'.)

    In prayers, Christians mention 'the faithful departed' (where 'faithful' means 'also Christian'!) and on gravestones a pious euphemism for 'died' is 'went to sleep [in the Lord]' or 'departed this life'.

    b

    • Member Info
      • Native Language:
      • English
      • Home Country:
      • United States
      • Current Location:
      • United States

    • Join Date: Dec 2010
    • Posts: 145
    #8

    not a teacher

    "He's taking a dirt nap."

    "He has assumed room temperature."


  6. apex2000's Avatar
    • Member Info
      • Native Language:
      • English
      • Home Country:
      • UK
      • Current Location:
      • Wales

    • Join Date: Nov 2005
    • Posts: 785
    #9

    Re: Any expression for the dead?

    I suggest that neither of those is showing any respect, which is what the OP was looking for.

  7. Copy-editor's Avatar
    • Member Info
      • Native Language:
      • English
      • Home Country:
      • England
      • Current Location:
      • Grenada

    • Join Date: May 2009
    • Posts: 40
    #10

    Re: not a teacher

    The first answers were all sensible and correct. Perhaps RIP (Rest In Peace) should get a mention -- it's not always formal.

    'Assumed room temperature' :) Not exactly flowing with respect but very funny.

    As it's the time of the year for being jolly, may I suggest that, to add a personal element, we use a term that is related to the person who has ceased being. For instance a musician could be said to be decomposing; a philosopher, deconstructing; even an unfriendly dog could be said to have disembarked ...

Page 1 of 2 1 2 LastLast

Similar Threads

  1. [General] dead and gone/ dead and buried
    By vil in forum Ask a Teacher
    Replies: 2
    Last Post: 30-Aug-2010, 06:51
  2. Help: what does " Let the dead bury the dead" mean?
    By sangui in forum Ask a Teacher
    Replies: 11
    Last Post: 16-Mar-2010, 20:37
  3. Replies: 1
    Last Post: 30-Dec-2009, 10:54
  4. dead dead
    By jctgf in forum Ask a Teacher
    Replies: 1
    Last Post: 20-Nov-2008, 02:02

Bookmarks

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •