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  1. euncu's Avatar
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    #1

    to jump, to leap, to hop

    I'll appreciate if you help me out on differentiating these words.

    Thanks for your replies in advance.

  2. Barb_D's Avatar
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    #2

    Re: to jump, to leap, to hop

    I don't see a difference between jumping and leaping, although hopping is on one foot.
    I'm not a teacher, but I write for a living. Please don't ask me about 2nd conditionals, but I'm a safe bet for what reads well in (American) English.

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    #3

    Re: to jump, to leap, to hop

    NOT A TEACHER.

    "Jumping" and "leaping" connote a greater amount of time spent in the air than "hopping."

  3. apex2000's Avatar
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    #4

    Re: to jump, to leap, to hop

    If we consider one of the athletics disciplines we have the hop, skip and jump (as it used to be called and the action still follows that description). Watch the action; the athlete take a run up to the start board where s/he hops off from one foot, lands on the other foot then takes off for the final jump when s/he lands on both feet. There is little or no discernible difference between the time in the air for each one.

    However, a jump is either up and down or an attempt to cover a horizontal distance. A leap is most likely an attempt to get somewhere, such as across a gorge, crevasse or other obstacle and may also be a leap out from a cliff down into water but not upwards. The hop is performed (jumping or leaping) taking off from one foot and landing on the other one.

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    #5

    Re: to jump, to leap, to hop

    Quote Originally Posted by apex2000 View Post
    The hop is performed (jumping or leaping) taking off from one foot and landing on the other one.
    I think you'll find, apex, that hopping means landing on the same foot that you took off with.

    Rover

  4. apex2000's Avatar
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    #6

    Re: to jump, to leap, to hop

    Oh dear! Time for me to get my eyes tested and the prescription changed. Apologies all round.

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