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    #1

    Nor/Or

    Hi,

    This is the example: He would not ignore Jack's behavior nor/or his words.

    Are 'nor' and 'or' both correct here? Or is 'nor' only used when preceded by neither?

    Mr. X

  1. bhaisahab's Avatar
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    #2

    Re: Nor/Or

    Quote Originally Posted by Gillnetter View Post
    Both are correct. Nor can be used without neither - I can't do this nor that, I can't do this or that.

    It wasn't the sun nor the moon that we saw, It wasn't the sun or the moon that we saw.
    I would say/write, "I can't do this nor can I do that" and "It wasn't the sun nor was it the moon that we saw". Your versions look/sound wrong to me.

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    #3

    Re: Nor/Or

    Quote Originally Posted by Mr. X View Post
    Hi,

    This is the example: He would not ignore Jack's behavior nor/or his words.

    Are 'nor' and 'or' both correct here? Or is 'nor' only used when preceded by neither?

    Mr. X
    ***** NOT A TEACHER *****


    Mr. X,

    I found this in Mr. Michael Swan's Practical English Usage

    (Oxford: University Press, 1995):

    She didn't phone that day or the next day. = Good English.

    She didn't phone that day, nor the next day. = More emphatic

    (stronger). (Notice the comma that indicates a pause.)

    I think that you may use "nor" in your sentence because it
    can be divided into two sentences, with one beginning with "nor":

    He would not ignore Jack's behavior.

    Nor would he ignore his words.


    (Of course, you cannot say:

    He would not ignore Jack's behavior.

    Or would he ignore his words.)


    THANK YOU

  2. indonesia's Avatar
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    #4

    Re: Nor/Or

    You have the option to use 'nor' when you are joining two negative clauses together.

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    #5

    Re: Nor/Or

    Thanks, everyone. Is this combination also fine?

    1) There were no more places to go, nor people to see.
    2) That didn't stop John from becoming depressed, nor his wife from going mad.
    Last edited by Mr. X; 02-Jan-2011 at 04:36.

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