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    #1

    on the knocker

    Dear teachers,

    Would you tell me how you pick out the mentioned below two identical expressions in bold?

    This record of the progress of the last voting company in Blackpoll shows what can be done if we work…on the knocker.

    on the knocker = from house to house

    Once she got a whole pile of stuff on the knocker and than the firm came and took it back.

    get something on the knocker = buy something on the installment plan

    Thanks for your efforts.

    Regards,

    V

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    #2

    Re: on the knocker

    I haven't heard on the knocker for paying in instalments. We do have on the knock or on the never never. Where did you get the sentence from?

  1. opa6x57's Avatar
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    #3

    Re: on the knocker

    =============================
    Not a teacher, 53-year-old American.
    =============================


    In AmE - we would say, "door-to-door" and "buy on time" or "buy on credit".

    I've never heard "on the knocker" used as in either of the examples given by the OP.

    In fact - to me, "on the knocker" would be properly used ONLY in the following instance - in American English:

    I noticed a decorative cat's head on the knocker - the door knocker.
    I really cannot think of another purpose for this phrase in American English.

    Just my opinion.

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    #4

    Re: on the knocker

    Definitely we read different books.

    I beg your pardon for unpleasantness you had to get reading my sore thread.

    Here is the required further explanation of my interpretation in my original post.

    This record of the progress of the last voting company in Blackpoll shows what can be done if we work…on the knocker. (“Listener”, May 7, 1959, Suppl.)

    (The canvassers who canvass for votes have to wander about the homes of their electorate knocking on their doors. (figurative meaning)

    Once she got a whole pile of stuff on the knocker and than the firm came and took it back. (Suppl.)

    (You have bought different things on the knocker (on the installment) but if it turns out to be impossible to pay in installments in due time difficulties are liable to occur by the inevitable knocking on your door of a representative of the respective firm.)

    In my poor opinion you (English speaking people) are very strange. You assume an innocent air by hearing the expression “Knock a Manchester tart” (see “American Pie”) and feel indignant at reading “knock on the door”

    Have you by any chance heard another interpretation of the expression in question?

    “How do you feel?”
    “Not quite up to the knocker!”

    or

    “Tell me, Martin,| he said.

    “Weren’t some of the popes – not exactly … you know … up to the knocker?” (J. Joyce, “Dubliners”)

    He was prepared for the exams up to the knocker.


    V.
    Last edited by vil; 03-Jan-2011 at 08:43.

  2. 5jj's Avatar
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    #5

    Re: on the knocker

    I did once suggest, Vil, that you picked your material from some pretty abstruse sources.

    If you are interested in what can possibly be said in English, or what has actually been said or written (even if only once), then carry on - you come up with some weird and wonderful things sometimes.

    If, however, you are interested in the language that is actually used by the majority of native speakers in the 21st century, you should find other sources, or start using corpora rather than isolated quotations.

    James Joyce is renowned for his inventiveness in language - and most of his inventive usages exist only in his works.

    Over the past couple of months or so, I have been interested to see some of the expressions you have come up with; however, at a rough guess I'd say that 90% of them would not be used by 90% of native speakers.

    On what you have come up with in this thread, my personal comments follow:

    This record of the progress of the last voting company in Blackpoll shows what can be done if we work…on the knocker.
    on the knocker = from house to house

    I would have understood the same as you, in context, but have never heard or seen this.

    Once she got a whole pile of stuff on the knocker and than the firm came and took it back.
    get something on the knocker = buy something on the installment plan

    I have never heard or seen this, and could only guess the meaning,

    “How do you feel?”
    “Not quite up to the knocker!” or

    “Tell me, Martin,| he said.
    “Weren’t some of the popes – not exactly … you know … up to the knocker?” (J. Joyce, “Dubliners”)

    He was prepared for the exams up to the knocker.


    I have never heard or seen any of these usages.

    Further comments:

    Would you tell me how you pick out the mentioned below two identical expressions in bold?

    I can only guess at what you mean by pick out in your questions.

    I beg your pardon for unpleasantness you had to get reading my sore thread.
    I don't understand this sentence.

    In my poor opinion you (English speaking people) are very strange. You assume an innocent air by hearing the expression “Knock a Manchester tart” (see “American Pie”) and feel indignant at reading “knock on the door”

    Nor this one.



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