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    #1

    a rhetorical question

    Dear teachers,

    Knowing that you were never short of an answer I venture to ask you concerning the wide variety of your native language. In my native language we use only one verb for one and all of the mentioned below ten sentences and you have to use all but ten different verbs, i.e. you stand in need of a wide range of verbs. Do you think this puts you in a more advantageous position than us – unfledged people? Or - quite contrary?

    He stabbed me in the stomach.

    The bullet tore through my leg.

    The sharp talons of a huge condor stabbed into my body.

    She jabbed at me with a knife.

    She pierced him with her eyes.

    Her eyes were boring into him.

    I was chilled to the marrow.

    I couldn’t stand the searching wing any longer.

    Spear a piece of fish with a fork and dip it in the batter.

    He savagely spears her in the heart!

    Thanks for your efforts.

    Regards,

    V

  1. apex2000's Avatar
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    #2

    Re: a rhetorical question

    Unfledged people? No, Vil, that relates to birds. Find another description for you and yours.

    'She pierced him with her eyes', no, in this case what you mean is that 'she stared at him with piercing eyes.' That is because eyes cannot pierce anything whereas a knife can.

    'I couldn’t stand the searching wing any longer', is incorrect. Did you mean wind instead of wing?

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    #3

    Re: a rhetorical question

    I'd say neither- languages have their strengths and weaknesses, and each will have shades of expression that reflect the culture of the people using it. We may have a big vocabulary, but I don't think this makes English a worse or a better language- just different from yours in this example, and a consequence of our history. There are surely things that you can express readily in Bulgarian that are not so easy to express in English. It's more horse for courses than better or worse IMO. As a learner, it may make things harder as you have to learn many words and find it difficult to translate directly, so you have to fall back on notes about context, but I can't say that having a word for the action of knifing someone that is different from a bird clawing something makes me feel greatly privileged.

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    #4

    Re: a rhetorical question

    Hi apex2000,

    Thank you again for your amendment. Your piercing look detects every mistake in my writing. You are in the right. It have to be “wind” and not “wing”, on the analogy of the expression “piercing wind”.

    In regard to your recommendation to search another description of me and the like I would pass it past my ears. In regard to your recommendation to search another description of me and the like I would pass it past my ears


    Besides the generally known meaning of the adjective “unfledged”, namely (of birds) not yet having developed feathers there is another figurative meaning, namely "young and inexperienced” as in “an unfledged lawyer/writer" which in my poor opinion is the write word here.

    Thank you again for your kindness.

    V.

  2. opa6x57's Avatar
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    #5

    Re: a rhetorical question

    Quote Originally Posted by vil View Post
    Besides the generally known meaning of the adjective “unfledged”, namely (of birds) not yet having developed feathers there is another figurative meaning, namely "young and inexperienced” as in “an unfledged lawyer/writer" which in my poor opinion is the write word here.

    Thank you again for your kindness.

    V.
    Most American speakers/writers would say fledgling instead of unfledged.

    A lawyer just starting out is a fledgling lawyer.
    A student just starting in a particular course of study could be referred to a fledgling student.

    ==================================
    Not a teacher. 53-year-old American.

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    #6

    Re: a rhetorical question

    Hi opa6x5.

    Thank you for your kindness.

    Your elucidation is of great service to me.

    Thank you again for your backing.

    V.

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    #7

    Re: a rhetorical question

    Quote Originally Posted by apex2000 View Post
    Unfledged people? No, Vil, that relates to birds. Find another description for you and yours.

    'She pierced him with her eyes', no, in this case what you mean is that 'she stared at him with piercing eyes.' That is because eyes cannot pierce anything whereas a knife can.

    'I couldn’t stand the searching wing any longer', is incorrect. Did you mean wind instead of wing?
    I think eyes can pierce. I see nothing wrong with the sentence.

  3. apex2000's Avatar
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    #8

    Re: a rhetorical question

    In the examples given in the OP it is clear that pierce is meant in the main definition - thrust or make a hole through.

    Native speakers are in a more advantageous position than non native speakers, your 'us'.

  4. 5jj's Avatar
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    #9

    Re: a rhetorical question

    Quote Originally Posted by vil View Post
    In my native language we use only one verb for one and all of the mentioned below ten sentences and you have to use all but ten different verbs, i.e. you stand in need of a wide range of verbs.
    Actually, Vil we (native speakers) do not 'stand in need' of a wide range of verbs. And we do not 'have to' use ten different verbs,; different speakers/writers have chosen to use different words.

    I do not know your native language, but I cannot believe that there is only one word available for stab, tear, jab, pierce, chill, search, spear.

    Do not forget that, in your seemingly endless search for new words, you trawl the internet and books of quotations for items. Most of the sentences you post are taken from what might be termed 'serious writers' - and many of them are either dead or unread by the majority of us, or both.


    You write, "Besides the generally known meaning of the adjective “unfledged”, namely (of birds) not yet having developed feathers there is another figurative meaning, namely "young and inexperienced” as in “an unfledged lawyer/writer" which in my poor opinion is the write right word here."
    You are entitled to your opinion, Vil, but a native speaker has told you, "Most American speakers/writers would say fledgling instead of unfledged". I would add that most British speakers would say the same. Your finding of one quotation containing 'unfledged' will not change this.

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