Page 3 of 3 First 1 2 3
Results 21 to 23 of 23
  1. Member
    Interested in Language
    • Member Info
      • Native Language:
      • English
      • Home Country:
      • United States
      • Current Location:
      • United States

    • Join Date: Dec 2010
    • Posts: 145
    #21

    not a teacher

    You can't knock on a door from a distance.

  2. opa6x57's Avatar
    Member
    Other
    • Member Info
      • Native Language:
      • American English
      • Home Country:
      • United States
      • Current Location:
      • United States

    • Join Date: Jul 2009
    • Posts: 139
    #22

    Re: knock on/at the door?

    Quote Originally Posted by RobertT View Post
    I'm not a native speaker but in my opinion, "knock AT the door" implies the location of the person doing the knocking. In this case, it is somewhere close to the door or "at the door".

    Therefore, I tend to think "he knocks at the door" as equivalent to "he stands in front of the door and he knocks"

    As for "knock on the door", to me, it has a literal meaning of knocking the hand against the door. This phrase only describes the action of knocking. In common sense, it should therefore imply the location of the person albeit indirectly.
    Exactly.

    Unless he is extend-a-man with extremely long arms, to be able to knock on the door, he must be at the door, knocking.

    I am an American English native speaker - 53 years old (not a teacher) and the reality is that these two phrases are functionally the same.

  3. 5jj's Avatar
    VIP Member
    Retired English Teacher
    • Member Info
      • Native Language:
      • British English
      • Home Country:
      • England
      • Current Location:
      • Czech Republic

    • Join Date: Oct 2010
    • Posts: 27,915
    #23

    Re: knock on/at the door?

    Quote Originally Posted by opa6x57 View Post
    I am an American English native speaker - 53 years old (not a teacher) and the reality is that these two phrases are functionally the same.
    I agree, and our feeling seems to be supported by the Corpus I mentioned in post #7.

    It appears that some people prefer 'at' and others 'on'. Some possibly use both.

    Unfortunately there also appear to be a number of users of only one form who believe that their preference is the only correct one. One of them even believes he knows what I would or would not say. I don't think that you, Vladimir and I are going to change any minds now.

Page 3 of 3 First 1 2 3

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •