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  1. AlJapone's Avatar
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    #1

    Who heads you?

    Dear Teachers.

    When you are headed for some disaster, who heads you?
    If the verb head were to be used as intransitive, how does the phrase sounds, the phrase "Al, you are headed for a fiasco!"
    Sounds like German?
    Or ungrammatical?
    Or neutral?

    Please let me share in your first hand experience, which I will never be able to have due to being a non-native.

    Best wishes,


    AlJapone
    Last edited by AlJapone; 04-Jan-2011 at 17:18. Reason: For clearer expression.

  2. BobK's Avatar
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    #2

    Re: Who heads you?

    Quote Originally Posted by AlJapone View Post
    Dear Teachers.

    When you are headed for some disaster, who heads you?
    If the varb head were to be used as intransitive, how does the phrase sounds, the phrase "Al, you are headed for a fiasco!"
    Sounds like German?
    Or ungrammatical?
    Or neutral?

    Please let me share in your first hand experience, which I will never be able to understand due to being a non-native.

    Best wishes,


    AlJapone
    Nobody 'heads' you; you have a 'heading' (or direction). Al could be either heading for a fiasco or headed for a fiasco - neither sounds German, though I think some British people might feel that 'headed for' sounds American. I don't, although I wouldn't use that expression myself.

    b

  3. AlJapone's Avatar
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    #3

    Re: Who heads you?

    Quote Originally Posted by BobK View Post
    Nobody 'heads' you; you have a 'heading' (or direction). Al could be either heading for a fiasco or headed for a fiasco - neither sounds German, though I think some British people might feel that 'headed for' sounds American. I don't, although I wouldn't use that expression myself.

    b
    Oh my god! It's an American invention, you say, don't you, BobK?

    Thank you for your opinion.


    AlJapone

  4. BobK's Avatar
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    #4

    Re: Who heads you?

    I wouldn't know; I doubt it. But I've had many teachers who wanted me to believe it was

    b

  5. AlJapone's Avatar
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    #5

    Re: Who heads you?

    Quote Originally Posted by BobK View Post
    I wouldn't know; I doubt it. But I've had many teachers who wanted me to believe it was

    b
    You are now one of them. ;]

    Best wishes,


    AlJapone

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    #6

    Re: Who heads you?

    Is there a typo, heeds (as in take notice of) instead of "heads"?

    In any case my built-in common sense correction filter interprets the segments as follows:

    When you are heading for disaster, who heeds you?

    Al, you are heading towards a fiasco!

  6. Barb_D's Avatar
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    #7

    Re: Who heads you?

    Is it only in American English that we say "You are headed for..."?

    That is my heading. I'm headed for it.
    Head for the hills!

    If I say "I'm dedicated to my studies right now" no one dedicated me; I dedicated myself. It's the same. No one "headed" me there, I headed there myself when I put myself on that heading.
    I'm not a teacher, but I write for a living. Please don't ask me about 2nd conditionals, but I'm a safe bet for what reads well in (American) English.

  7. AlJapone's Avatar
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    #8

    Re: Who heads you?

    Quote Originally Posted by magimagicE View Post
    Is there a typo, heeds (as in take notice of) instead of "heads"?

    In any case my built-in common sense correction filter interprets the segments as follows:

    When you are heading for disaster, who heeds you?

    Al, you are heading towards a fiasco!
    hello, magimagicE.
    I think you might get some interesting search results if you googled with "am|are|is|was|were headed for".

    My first thought was like this:
    There is something wrong with this phrase; who is the actor of 'head'? Don't tell me it's some kind of divine intervention going on here.
    Then I remembered English and German were siblings, so to speak, and guessed that this might be the perfect with be instead of have. But I could be never sure what kind of register it belonged to in terms of tone. So, I "asked a teacher."

    Best wishes,


    AlJapone
    Last edited by AlJapone; 04-Jan-2011 at 20:07.

  8. 5jj's Avatar
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    #9

    Re: Who heads you?

    Quote Originally Posted by Barb_D View Post
    Is it only in American English that we say "You are headed for..."?
    Nope. I guess I do.

  9. AlJapone's Avatar
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    #10

    Re: Who heads you?

    Quote Originally Posted by Barb_D View Post
    If I say "I'm dedicated to my studies right now" no one dedicated me; I dedicated myself. It's the same. No one "headed" me there, I headed there myself when I put myself on that heading.
    Hello, Barb_D.
    Are 'dedicate oneself' and 'head oneself' grammatically parallel? I think you just head whereas you dedicate yourself.

    Best wishes,


    AlJapone

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