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    #1

    You should do "your" homework.

    I should ask you this for some reason. Is it okay to omit the word "your" in the following sentence? Thank you.

    You should do (your) homework.
    Last edited by giddyman; 05-Jan-2011 at 08:17.

  1. jessica.permatasari's Avatar
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    #2

    Talking Re: You should do "your" homework.

    Quote Originally Posted by giddyman View Post
    I should ask you this for some reason. Is it okay to omit the word "your" in the following sentence? Thank you.

    You should do (your) homework.
    It's OK I think...
    There's nothing wrong in it...

  2. Raymott's Avatar
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    #3

    Re: You should do "your" homework.

    Quote Originally Posted by giddyman View Post
    I should ask you this for some reason. Is it okay to omit the word "your" in the following sentence? Thank you.

    You should do (your) homework.
    No it isn't. Without "your", it could mean, "You should do someone else's homework; You should do homework unrelated to your studies ..."
    But generally it would mean, "You should do some homework."
    "Your homework" means the homework you've been given by your teacher.

  3. jessica.permatasari's Avatar
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    #4

    Re: You should do "your" homework.

    Quote Originally Posted by Raymott View Post
    No it isn't. Without "your", it could mean, "You should do someone else's homework; You should do homework unrelated to your studies ..."
    But generally it would mean, "You should do some homework."
    "Your homework" means the homework you've been given by your teacher.
    I always do my own homework, then I didn't think about what you've written above..

    Thanks for it. ^.~

  4. Raymott's Avatar
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    #5

    Re: You should do "your" homework.

    Quote Originally Posted by jessica.permatasari View Post
    I always do my own homework, then I didn't think about what you've written above..

    Thanks for it. ^.~
    I'm sure you do. Many don't!

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    #6

    Re: You should do "your" homework.

    As Raymott as said, the problem is one of meaning and logic rather than grammar. There are plenty of cases where the article isn't used with homework, but this is one where it's better with it.

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    #7

    Re: You should do "your" homework.

    Quote Originally Posted by Tdol View Post
    As Raymott as said, the problem is one of meaning and logic rather than grammar. There are plenty of cases where the article isn't used with homework, but this is one where it's better with it.
    I see your point, but it would be a strange way to ask whether a sentence is grammatically correct. It's strikes me as being like wanting to know whether "Is he?" a sentence; so you ask whether it's OK to remove the word "dead" from the sentence "Is he dead?"
    The answer is, "Well, yes and no".

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