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  1. milan2003_07's Avatar
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    #1

    assure/reassure

    Hello,

    Both words ("assure" and "reassure") are usually used when one person tells something to another person so as to ensure there is nothing to worry about. For example,

    They assured me that everything would be provided on the spot
    He assured that
    He reassured his wife that her mother would manage to live with them for a couple months.

    Do these words have any difference or they can be used interchangeably?

    Best

  2. 5jj's Avatar
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    #2

    Re: assure/reassure

    If you assure somebody of something, or that something is so, you make them sure of its truth/certainty.

    If you reassure somebody, you make them less nervous or worried.

  3. milan2003_07's Avatar
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    #3

    Re: assure/reassure

    Quote Originally Posted by fivejedjon View Post
    If you assure somebody of something, or that something is so, you make them sure of its truth/certainty.

    If you reassure somebody, you make them less nervous or worried.
    I see. However usually when we assure someone that something is the case we make them less nervous and worried because from now on they know that they'll get or see what they're expecting to. So the verbs are really very close in meaning. When we assure someone, we reassure them at the same time.

    Or maybe you mean that when a person is worried about something you can just say a few words that will make them calm down without promising anyhing concrete?

    1) I'm worried about my plane landing on time
    Don't worry, we are on time and we will land at 13.00 as scheduled

    Assuring. Right?

    2) I'm worried about my plane landing on time
    Don't worry. Our airline will try their best to provide good service and avoid delays

    Reassuring. Right?

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    #4

    Re: assure/reassure

    I'm not a teacher.

    Hi milan2003_07,

    assure = affirm, confirm, ensure, guaranty, persuade, promise, secure

    reassure = brace, comfort, encourage, hearten, inspirit, nerve, rally

    assure = to cause (another) to believe or feel sure about something

    Read more: http://www.answers.com/topic/assure#ixzz1ASlStcs0


    reassure = to assure again; restore confidence to

    reinsure make assurance doubly sure

    http://www.answers.com/reassure?afid=TBarLookup&nafid=27

    V.

  4. 5jj's Avatar
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    #5

    Re: assure/reassure

    Quote Originally Posted by milan2003_07 View Post
    When we assure someone, we reassure them at the same time.

    Not necessarily.

    Employer:That's the third complaint I've had about you this week. I am going to have to let you go.
    Employee: You can't just dismiss me like that.
    Employer: I assure you I can.

    Or maybe you mean that when a person is worried about something you can just say a few words that will make them calm down without promising anyhing concrete?

    1) I'm worried about my plane landing on time
    Don't worry, we are on time and we will land at 13.00 as scheduled

    Assuring. Right? Reassuring, more likely. (The key is 'Don't worry')

    2) I'm worried about my plane landing on time
    Don't worry. Our airline will try their best to provide good service and avoid delays

    Reassuring. Right? Yes.
    3). Client: I want to make sure my shipments arrive on time.
    Shipping Company Rep: Our company guarantees delivery times.

    That is an assurance.
    Last edited by 5jj; 08-Jan-2011 at 23:51. Reason: typo

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