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    #1

    Question "by a whisker and a chad"

    Hi!

    Is this an idiom:

    "He lost that race by a whisker and a chad" (talking about Al Gore)


    Thanks

  1. Barb_D's Avatar
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    #2

    Re: "by a whisker and a chad"

    "By a whisker" is, yes. Think how tiny a whisker is. It means it was very close.

    The "chad" part refers to the ballots in Florida. You can look up more about the election if you want to understand the role chads played.
    I'm not a teacher, but I write for a living. Please don't ask me about 2nd conditionals, but I'm a safe bet for what reads well in (American) English.

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    #3

    Re: "by a whisker and a chad"

    That was a great hint for me.. Now it makes sense.

  2. 5jj's Avatar
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    #4

    Re: "by a whisker and a chad"

    Quote Originally Posted by lorenya View Post
    That was a great hint for me.. Now it makes sense.
    I am putting what follows into a smaller font, because it is not really relevant to the OP.

    Some of us Brits were heartly amused by the chad episode. From our ducal palaces and (unelected) seats in the House of Lords we were most amused to see American 'democracy' exposed as the sham that it is. Our own dear (unelected) Queen could never be exposed to accusations of 'sham' and 'fraudulent'. We in the UK, the fount of democracy in the post-Athenian world, know that in a true (i.e. British) democracy, one's leaders are born to the role, not subject to holes punched arbitrarily in pieces of paper.

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