Results 1 to 4 of 4
  1. vectra's Avatar
    • Member Info
      • Native Language:
      • Russian
      • Home Country:
      • Ukraine
      • Current Location:
      • Ukraine

    • Join Date: Jun 2005
    • Posts: 288
    • Post Thanks / Like
    #1

    out on a limb

    Hello,

    Does these sentences sound OK?
    1. Having told the truth, Paul appeared in a risky position (change for out on a limb). Now he was suspected.


    Why do you underestimate him? (change for sell him short)
    Wearing glasses is not a cause to underestimate a man.

    Thank you for the time and help.

  2. bhaisahab's Avatar
    • Member Info
      • Native Language:
      • British English
      • Home Country:
      • England
      • Current Location:
      • England

    • Join Date: Apr 2008
    • Posts: 25,278
    • Post Thanks / Like
    #2

    Re: out on a limb

    Quote Originally Posted by vectra View Post
    Hello,

    Do these sentences sound OK?
    1. Having told the truth, Paul appeared in to be in a risky position/to be out on a limb. (change for out on a limb). Now he was suspected.


    Why do you underestimate him? (change for sell him short)
    Wearing glasses is not a cause to underestimate a man.

    Thank you for the time and help.
    I don't think "sell him short" works.

  3. Barb_D's Avatar
    • Member Info
      • Native Language:
      • American English
      • Home Country:
      • United States
      • Current Location:
      • United States

    • Join Date: Mar 2007
    • Posts: 18,886
    • Post Thanks / Like
    #3

    Re: out on a limb

    You could say he knew he was going out on a limb by telling the truth, knowing he might draw suspicion.
    I'm not a teacher, but I write for a living. Please don't ask me about 2nd conditionals, but I'm a safe bet for what reads well in (American) English.

  4. vectra's Avatar
    • Member Info
      • Native Language:
      • Russian
      • Home Country:
      • Ukraine
      • Current Location:
      • Ukraine

    • Join Date: Jun 2005
    • Posts: 288
    • Post Thanks / Like
    #4

    Re: out on a limb

    As you might have guessed, 'sell him short=underestamate' is one of those expressions my students will have to get their heads around on Friday. I am sure they will do fine. They are serious-minded, and have been revising all this time.
    But the expression itself causes some questions. Could you give an example sentence for me to see the way it is normally used in everyday speech? Or has it dropped from everyday usage?

    Thank you in advance.
    Last edited by vectra; 11-Jan-2011 at 21:10. Reason: second thoughts

Similar Threads

  1. Go out on a limb
    By anupumh in forum English Idioms and Sayings
    Replies: 4
    Last Post: 26-Aug-2009, 18:54

Bookmarks

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •