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    #1

    skim/ pick up

    Dear teachers,

    Would you be so kind to share with me your opinion about the interpretation of the words in bold in the following sentence?

    You can train yourself, with practice, to "skim" what you read; that is to move your eye rapidly down the lines to pick up the key words.

    skim = read superficially

    pick up = get to know or become aware of

    Thanks for your efforts.

    Regards,

    V

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    #2

    Re: skim/ pick up

    You've found the correct meanings of the two verbs. What exactly are you asking for?

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    #3

    Re: skim/ pick up

    Do you get me?

    I think you know what I am up to.

    Here is really a large selection.

    (skĭm)

    v., skimmed, skim·ming, skims. v.tr.

      1. To remove floating matter from (a liquid).
      2. To remove (floating matter) from a liquid.
      3. To take away the choicest or most readily attainable contents or parts from.

    • To coat or cover with or as if with a thin layer, as of scum.

      1. To throw so as to bounce or slide: skimming stones on the pond.
      2. To glide or pass quickly and lightly over or along (a surface). See synonyms at brush1.

    • To read or glance through (a book, for example) quickly or superficially.
    • Slang. To fail to declare part of (certain income, such as winnings) to avoid tax payment.

    v.intr.
    • To move or pass swiftly and lightly over or near a surface; glide.
    • To give a quick and superficial reading, scrutiny, or consideration; glance: skimmed through the newspaper.
    • To become coated with a thin layer.
    • Slang. To fail to declare certain income to avoid tax payment.

    n.
    • The act of skimming.
    • Something that has been skimmed.
    • A thin layer or film.
    • Slang. The profit gained by skimming.

    pick up

    1. Lift, take up by hand, as in Please pick up that book from the floor. [Early 1300s]
    2. Collect or gather, as in First they had to pick up the pieces of broken glass.
    3. Tidy, put in order, as in Let's pick up the bedroom, or I'm always picking up after Pat. [Mid-1800s]
    4. Take on passengers or freight, as in The bus picks up commuters at three stops.
    5. Acquire casually, get without great effort or by accident. For example, I picked up a nice coat at the sale, or She had no trouble picking up French. This usage is even extended to contracting diseases, as in I think I picked up the baby's cold. [Early 1500s]
    6. Claim, as in He picked up his laundry every Friday.
    7. Buy, as in Please pick up some wine at the store on your way home.
    8. pick up the bill or check or tab. Accept a charge in order to pay it, as in They always wait for us to pick up the tab. [Colloquial; mid-1900s]
    9. Increase speed or rate, as in The plane picked up speed, or The conductor told the strings to pick up the tempo.
    10. Gain, as in They picked up five yards on that pass play.
    11. Take into custody, apprehend, as in The police picked him up for burglary. [Colloquial; second half of 1800s]
    12. Make a casual acquaintance with, especially in anticipation of sexual relations, as in A stranger tried to pick her up at the bus station. [Slang; late 1800s]
    13. Come upon, find, detect, as in The dog picked up the scent, or They picked up two submarines on sonar, or I can't pick up that station on the car radio.
    14. Resume, as in Let's pick up the conversation after lunch.
    15. Improve or cause to improve in condition or activity, as in Sales picked up last fall, or He picked up quickly after he got home from the hospital, or A cup of coffee will pick you up. [1700s]
    16. Gather one's belongings, as in She just picked up and left him.
    17. pick oneself up. Recover from a fall or other mishap, as in Jim picked himself up and stood there waiting. [Mid-1800s] Also see the subsequent entries beginning with pick up.

    Last edited by vil; 12-Jan-2011 at 19:23.

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    #4

    Re: skim/ pick up

    skim
    To read or glance through (a book, for example) quickly or superficially.

    pick up
    Collect or gather

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