Results 1 to 8 of 8
    • Member Info
      • Native Language:
      • Chinese
      • Home Country:
      • Malaysia
      • Current Location:
      • Malaysia

    • Join Date: Dec 2010
    • Posts: 16
    #1

    Usage of 'ie'

    Is the 'ie' correctly use in the following sentence?

    We would appreciate it if your Board could kindly allow us to furnish estimate of tax payable for year 2011 at $54,000 (ie $108,000/12 x 6).

    • Member Info
      • Native Language:
      • English
      • Home Country:
      • United States
      • Current Location:
      • Canada

    • Join Date: Oct 2008
    • Posts: 1,211
    #2

    Re: Usage of 'ie'

    Probably. Although there are other difficulties in the sentence, perhaps because I'm reading it out of context? Let's just say you need an "an" between "furnish" and "estimate" and then it will at least read better, although I still don't understand it.

    I.e. is a Latin abbreviation for "that is" and should be written with periods and followed by a comma (although some would omit the comma): "(i.e., $108,000/12 x 6).

    It is often confused with "e.g.", which means "for example".

    I.e. is specific, allowing only one acceptable solution, as in your case. E.g. gives a sampling of one or more soultions that may relate to the subject.

    A common error with both "e.g." and "for example" is the tendancy to finish with an "etc." (e.g., eggs, bacon, etc.). The "etc." is redundant in a "for example" list. "I want you to buy breakfast stuff: eggs, bacon, etc." is correct, but "I want you to buy breakfast stuff (for example, eggs, bacon, etc.)." is wrong.

    I.e. wouldn't allow an etc. either, of course. "I want you to buy everything I need for breakfast (i.e., eggs, butter, bacon, salt, pepper, tomatoes, mushrooms and bread)." That's a complete list, as required by the "that is" or "i.e." expression.

  1. 5jj's Avatar
    • Member Info
      • Native Language:
      • British English
      • Home Country:
      • England
      • Current Location:
      • Czech Republic

    • Join Date: Oct 2010
    • Posts: 28,134
    #3

    Re: Usage of 'ie'

    jlinger's response is, as usual, helpful. I disagree on on or two minor points. These may be a result of British/North American differences, or it may be just personal.

    1.I.e. is a Latin abbreviation for "that is" and should be written with periods
    Some writers do not consider the periods to be neccessary. (It's never wrong to use them.)

    I.e. is specific, allowing only one acceptable solution, as in your case. E.g. gives a sampling of one or more soultions that may relate to the subject.
    I think the following is acceptable: "I'll see you at the beginning of next week, i.e. Monday or Tuesday".

    A common error with both "e.g." and "for example" is the tendancy to finish with an "etc." (e.g., eggs, bacon, etc.). The "etc." is redundant in a "for example" list. "I want you to buy breakfast stuff: eggs, bacon, etc." is correct, but "I want you to buy breakfast stuff (for example, eggs, bacon, etc.)." is wrong.
    It is certainly not a usage to be recommended. It is indeed a common error, so common that some would feel it is not an error.

    I.e. wouldn't allow an etc. either, of course. "I want you to buy everything I need for breakfast (i.e., eggs, butter, bacon, salt, pepper, tomatoes, mushrooms and bread)." That's a complete list, as required by the "that is" or "i.e." expression.
    I'd make the same comment as for 'e.g.'[/QUOTE]

    • Member Info
      • Native Language:
      • English
      • Home Country:
      • United States
      • Current Location:
      • Canada

    • Join Date: Oct 2008
    • Posts: 1,211
    #4

    Re: Usage of 'ie'

    Regarding 'I think the following is acceptable: "I'll see you at the beginning of next week, i.e. Monday or Tuesday".' - absolutely. I didn't really know how to say it, but the i.e. list , if there is a list, is total. In your example, you can't come on Wednesday or Sunday. It's Monday or Tuesday, or not at all. That's what "i.e"/"that is" means.

    If you had said, "see you at the beginning of the week, e.g., Monday or Tuesday" then I could rightfully ask, "Would Sunday be all right? I'm also free on Wednesday, if that's okay?"

    However, I'll hold firm on my periods. It is an abbreviation, not a symbol or contraction, and as such, requires periods. For example, Mr. is acceptable both ways, on both sides of the Atlantic - as it is considered by some to be an abbreviation, and by others a symbol (like km or cm - these are symbols, not abbreviations, and as such don't have periods anywhere).

    But as usual, the key in disputes like this is consistency. If you stick to one way or the other consistently, it is probably all right.

    BTW, as I almost typed "alright" there for a second, I am wondering when did et cetera become one word etc.? I have seen old books where it was written et c. I fear it will happen to all right in my lifetime!

  2. 5jj's Avatar
    • Member Info
      • Native Language:
      • British English
      • Home Country:
      • England
      • Current Location:
      • Czech Republic

    • Join Date: Oct 2010
    • Posts: 28,134
    #5

    Re: Usage of 'ie'

    Quote Originally Posted by jlinger View Post
    I'll hold firm on my periods. It is an abbreviation, not a symbol or contraction, and as such, requires periods.
    That's fine. Some British writers feel the same. It is, however, acceptable in BrE to write abbreviations without periods.

    BTW, as I almost typed "alright" there for a second, I am wondering when did et cetera become one word etc.? I have seen old books where it was written et c. I fear it will happen to all right in my lifetime!
    I don't recall seeing et c, but I have certainly seen & c, which is the same thing. The all right battle has almost been lost. I mourn the fusion of on to.

    • Member Info
      • Native Language:
      • English
      • Home Country:
      • United States
      • Current Location:
      • Canada

    • Join Date: Oct 2008
    • Posts: 1,211
    #6

    Re: Usage of 'ie'

    Right. It was & c that I saw, not et c. Thanks.

    Periods. A dotty confusion, for sure.

    I love the convention that says that if it's not a clean abbreviation (that is, truncated word) then it doesn't get a period. Therefore, it's "Prof." with but "Mr" and "Dr" without.

    That is the only way you can tell the true meaning of 17 St James St. - Saint doesn't get a period, and Street does.

    On to - you mourn that it's onto? I have to look that one up. I thought it was hundreds of years old. Is it recent?

  3. 5jj's Avatar
    • Member Info
      • Native Language:
      • British English
      • Home Country:
      • England
      • Current Location:
      • Czech Republic

    • Join Date: Oct 2010
    • Posts: 28,134
    #7

    Re: Usage of 'ie'

    Quote Originally Posted by jlinger View Post
    That is the only way you can tell the true meaning of 17 St James St. - Saint doesn't get a period, and Street does
    St is what I write. Even by your convention, that is fine: Street

    • Member Info
      • Native Language:
      • British English
      • Home Country:
      • UK
      • Current Location:
      • Laos

    • Join Date: Nov 2002
    • Posts: 57,912
    #8

    Re: Usage of 'ie'

    Quote Originally Posted by jlinger View Post

    I love the convention that says that if it's not a clean abbreviation (that is, truncated word) then it doesn't get a period. Therefore, it's "Prof." with but "Mr" and "Dr" without.

    It's still alive in BrE, but probably a bit endangered. I blame the internet.

Similar Threads

  1. usage
    By princesabharwal in forum Ask a Teacher
    Replies: 1
    Last Post: 13-Sep-2009, 17:20
  2. usage
    By princesabharwal in forum Ask a Teacher
    Replies: 1
    Last Post: 13-Sep-2009, 16:53
  3. usage
    By princesabharwal in forum Ask a Teacher
    Replies: 1
    Last Post: 13-Sep-2009, 06:04
  4. [General] suffix of 'ie' & English names
    By thedaffodils in forum Ask a Teacher
    Replies: 6
    Last Post: 15-Aug-2008, 08:47
  5. Usage of 'likely'.
    By HaraKiriBlade in forum Ask a Teacher
    Replies: 1
    Last Post: 01-Dec-2006, 04:10

Bookmarks

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •