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  1. milan2003_07's Avatar
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    #1

    succumb

    Hello,

    The word "succumb" often means the same as "to die" when the result is death. However as far as I've understood from the dictionary, "succumb" can also mean "to yield to something" and not always "to die". For example:

    1) She succumbed to cancer in spite of 5 year fight with thisdisease = She died of cancer because cancer is usually a deadly disease

    2) She succumbed to injury and was unable to play within the next two yeras = She didn't die, but her injury prevented her from playing

    3) He succumbed to a disease and was soon registered as a disable = She got crippled (because of TB, for example), but she didn't die.

    Are my explanations correct?

    How about "to succumb to disease"? Can it mean both "to die of a disease" and "to be affected by it, but survive"

    Best

  2. 5jj's Avatar
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    #2

    Re: succumb

    The Oxford ALD defines 'succumb' thus: "to fail to resist an attack, an illness, a temptation, etc".

    Death, therefore, is not the inevitable result of succumbing.

    Quote Originally Posted by milan2003_07 View Post
    How about "to succumb to disease"? Can it mean both "to die of a disease" and "to be affected by it, but survive
    Probably, yes. Context and co-text will make the meaning clear.


    We hope.

  3. milan2003_07's Avatar
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    #3

    Re: succumb

    Thanks!!!

    What about my sentences above? If they aren't satisfactory and in your opinion don't illustrate the usage of "succumb", please provide some examples demonstrating the correct usage.

  4. 5jj's Avatar
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    #4

    Re: succumb

    Quote Originally Posted by milan2003_07 View Post
    What about my sentences above? If they aren't satisfactory and in your opinion don't illustrate the usage of "succumb", please provide some examples demonstrating the correct usage.
    Milan, you are greedy. My last post addresses those questions in general terms.

    Look at what I wrote, and think about it when you look at your questions. If you then have any real problems, I (or another member) will try to help.

    I am not, however, going to do all your thinking for you.

  5. milan2003_07's Avatar
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    #5

    Re: succumb

    Dear fivejerton,

    I'll think, of course. Believe you me I know what a thinking process is because I'm a mathematician and use my brains every day However in English not everything obeys logic and sometimes it's necessary not only to explain in general, but to comment on particular things because examples are usually more powerful than rules.

    Anyway, we're all volunteers here and answer questions the way we want and like. I can't make anyone tell me something. I can only ask for it. So I will study what I've got so far.

  6. Barb_D's Avatar
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    #6

    Re: succumb

    If I read that someone has succumbed to a disease, I would assume that meant he or she had died -- but as 5jj says, context may make other interpretations possible.
    Last edited by Barb_D; 14-Jan-2011 at 14:21.
    I'm not a teacher, but I write for a living. Please don't ask me about 2nd conditionals, but I'm a safe bet for what reads well in (American) English.

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    #7

    Re: succumb

    ***** NOT A TEACHER *****


    Milan,

    (1) I have read with great interest your question and the excellent answers from the

    moderator and the teacher.

    (2) I, of course, consulted Dr. Google and found a wonderful thread (19 posts).

    (3) I am always hesitant to recommend threads at other websites, but I think that

    usingenglish.com lets us link to other websites so long as the recommended thread is

    actually helpful and so long as we do not abuse this privilege.

    (a) So please google "to succumb-WordReference Forums." (Be sure that there is NO

    space between "Word" and "Reference.") It will probably answer all of your questions.

    ***** NOT A TEACHER *****
    Last edited by TheParser; 14-Jan-2011 at 01:09.

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    #8

    Re: succumb

    To me, succumb has only one meaning: "fail to resist." If you succumb to something deadly, you are, perforce, dead.

  7. 5jj's Avatar
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    #9

    Re: succumb

    TheParser: usingenglish.com lets us link to other websites so long as the recommended thread is actually helpful and so long as we do not abuse this privilege.

    5jj: I am sure nobody here objects to helpful links. Thanks for that one. Here it is as a link:
    to succumb - WordReference Forums

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    #10

    Re: succumb

    Quote Originally Posted by milan2003_07 View Post
    Hello,

    The word "succumb" often means the same as "to die" when the result is death. However as far as I've understood from the dictionary, "succumb" can also mean "to yield to something" and not always "to die". For example:

    1) She succumbed to cancer in spite of 5 year fight with thisdisease = She died of cancer because cancer is usually a deadly disease

    2) She succumbed to injury and was unable to play within the next two yeras = She didn't die, but her injury prevented her from playing

    3) He succumbed to a disease and was soon registered as a disable = She got crippled (because of TB, for example), but she didn't die.

    Are my explanations correct?

    How about "to succumb to disease"? Can it mean both "to die of a disease" and "to be affected by it, but survive"

    Best

    ***** NOT A TEACHER *****


    Milan,


    (1) I was reading something today that reminded me about this thread.

    (2) It is a true story about Konrad Adenauer (1876 - 1967), the German

    leader.

    (3) This is what I read:

    When Adenauer ... was approaching the age of ninety, he

    succumbed to a heavy cold. His personal physician, unable to

    be of very much help, had to put up with Adenauer's impatience.

    "I'm not a magician," [said the doctor]. "I can't make you

    young again."

    "I haven't asked you to," [answered Herr Adenauer]. "All I

    want is to go on getting older."

    For this incident, I hereby credit:

    Clifton Fadiman (editor), The Little, Brown Book of Anecdotes

    (Boston, Toronto: Little, Brown and Company, 1985), page 7.


    ***** NOT A TEACHER *****

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