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    #1

    a 'drink' problem

    Hello!

    We played tennis and then we went to a cafe for a drink.

    Is it possible that 'for a drink' may imply 'an alcoholic drink'? I need to avoid any ambiguity. Is it better to be more precise, for example:

    ....and then went to a cafe for a coffee (tea, juice etc).

    Thank you in advance.

  1. 5jj's Avatar
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    #2

    Re: a 'drink' problem

    Quote Originally Posted by Verona_82 View Post
    Hello!

    We played tennis and then we went to a cafe for a drink.

    Is it possible that 'for a drink' may imply 'an alcoholic drink'? I need to avoid any ambiguity. Is it better to be more precise, for example:

    ....and then went to a cafe for a coffee (tea, juice etc).
    Your sentence doesn't imply an alcoholic drink. It would if you said that you had gone to a pub or bar.

    If it's important that you don't give the slightest suggestion of alcohol, then your second suggestion is perfectly natual.

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    #3

    Re: a 'drink' problem

    Oh, thank you! The dictionaries I checked gave the expression only with an 'alcoholic' meaning

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    #4

    Re: a 'drink' problem

    Quote Originally Posted by Verona_82 View Post
    Oh, thank you! The dictionaries I checked gave the expression only with an 'alcoholic' meaning
    The implication would be there if I sais to a colleague at the end of the working day, "Do you fancy (going for) a drink?"

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