Page 1 of 3 1 2 3 LastLast
Results 1 to 10 of 22
  1. Ducklet Cat's Avatar
    • Member Info
      • Native Language:
      • Arabic
      • Home Country:
      • Kuwait
      • Current Location:
      • Kuwait

    • Join Date: Dec 2005
    • Posts: 319
    #1

    Arrow Lost, missing, lacking

    If I lose something, then the thing is lost not losing.


    But when I miss a book, the the book is missing, not missed!

    And If my body lacks vitamin A, then vitamin A is lacking! Shouldn't it be lacked?


    Why is that?!

  2. 5jj's Avatar
    • Member Info
      • Native Language:
      • British English
      • Home Country:
      • England
      • Current Location:
      • Czech Republic

    • Join Date: Oct 2010
    • Posts: 28,134
    #2

    Re: Lost, missing, lacking

    Quote Originally Posted by Ducklet Cat View Post
    If I lose something, then the thing is lost not losing.

    But when I miss a book, the the book is missing, not missed! NO
    If you miss (=feel sad because you haven't got it any more) a book, the book is missed!

    If you can't find the book, then it is missing (adjective).

  3. easybreakable's Avatar
    • Member Info
      • Native Language:
      • Arabic
      • Home Country:
      • Libya
      • Current Location:
      • Libya

    • Join Date: Feb 2010
    • Posts: 249
    #3

    Re: Lost, missing, lacking

    to miss = to regret that a person or thing is not present.

    lack = to not have or not have enough of something that is needed or wanted.

    and your own examples represent the definitions very well.

  4. Ducklet Cat's Avatar
    • Member Info
      • Native Language:
      • Arabic
      • Home Country:
      • Kuwait
      • Current Location:
      • Kuwait

    • Join Date: Dec 2005
    • Posts: 319
    #4

    Re: Lost, missing, lacking

    Quote Originally Posted by fivejedjon View Post
    If you miss (=feel sad because you haven't got it any more) a book, the book is missed!

    If you can't find the book, then it is missing (adjective).
    I see. Thanks.
    But isn't missed also an adjective?
    I mean when I say:
    I'm bored.
    he's boring.

    Aren't both bored and boring adjectives?

    Thanks.

  5. Ducklet Cat's Avatar
    • Member Info
      • Native Language:
      • Arabic
      • Home Country:
      • Kuwait
      • Current Location:
      • Kuwait

    • Join Date: Dec 2005
    • Posts: 319
    #5

    Re: Lost, missing, lacking

    Quote Originally Posted by easybreakable View Post
    to miss = to regret that a person or thing is not present.

    lack = to not have or not have enough of something that is needed or wanted.

    and your own examples represent the definitions very well.
    I got why miss is different, because it has two meanings.

    But I'm still not comfortable about "lack".
    I think saying that "Vitamin A is lacked in one's body" is right.
    Saying ""Vitamin A is lacking in one's body" also sounds right.
    I'm confused.

  6. 5jj's Avatar
    • Member Info
      • Native Language:
      • British English
      • Home Country:
      • England
      • Current Location:
      • Czech Republic

    • Join Date: Oct 2010
    • Posts: 28,134
    #6

    Re: Lost, missing, lacking

    But isn't missed also an adjective?
    The past participle of MISS can function as an adjective we can speak of a missed opportunity.

    I mean when I say: I'm bored. he's boring. Aren't both bored and boring adjectives?

    It's not always easy to say whether a structure is a participle or adjective in some short tenses when the verb is BE.

    The journey is boring me. - verb, present progressive.
    The journey is boring. - adjective.

    I was bored by the whole affair. - verb, past simple passive.
    I was bored. - adjective.


    I think saying that "Vitamin A is lacked in one's body" is right.
    We just don't say that.


    Saying ""Vitamin A is lacking in one's body" also sounds right.
    It is right.

    I'm confused.
    It just happens that LACK is not used in the passive.

  7. easybreakable's Avatar
    • Member Info
      • Native Language:
      • Arabic
      • Home Country:
      • Libya
      • Current Location:
      • Libya

    • Join Date: Feb 2010
    • Posts: 249
    #7

    Re: Lost, missing, lacking

    Quote Originally Posted by Ducklet Cat View Post


    I think saying that "Vitamin A is lacked in one's body" is right.
    Saying ""Vitamin A is lacking in one's body" also sounds right.
    I'm confused.
    "Vitamin A is lacked in one's body"---> True sentence.

    ""Vitamin A is lacking in one's body"---> ?
    ^ this is improper use of the verb "lack", simply because "Vitamin A " is the object, so the sentence in the active form must be "One's body is lacking vitamin A".

  8. 5jj's Avatar
    • Member Info
      • Native Language:
      • British English
      • Home Country:
      • England
      • Current Location:
      • Czech Republic

    • Join Date: Oct 2010
    • Posts: 28,134
    #8

    Re: Lost, missing, lacking

    Quote Originally Posted by easybreakable View Post
    "Vitamin A is lacked in one's body"---> True sentence. NO. 'Lack' is not used in the passive.

    ""Vitamin A is lacking in one's body"---> ?
    ^ this is improper use of the verb "lack", simply because "Vitamin A " is the object, so the sentence in the active form must be "One's body is lacking vitamin A".
    You may consider it improper, but the verb is sometimes used in this way. Vitamin A is the subject.

    One's body lacks vitamin A is also possible.

  9. Ducklet Cat's Avatar
    • Member Info
      • Native Language:
      • Arabic
      • Home Country:
      • Kuwait
      • Current Location:
      • Kuwait

    • Join Date: Dec 2005
    • Posts: 319
    #9

    Re: Lost, missing, lacking

    I see, thanks. :)
    I guess some verbs are tricky, or maybe I'm thinking of the sentence is my own language and trying to translate it into English (subconsciously), and that's what is causing me to think that it "sounds" right.

    Regards.

    • Member Info
      • Native Language:
      • Polish
      • Home Country:
      • Poland
      • Current Location:
      • Poland

    • Join Date: Jul 2010
    • Posts: 5,098
    #10

    Re: Lost, missing, lacking

    I'm not sure whether grammarians call it passive but the sentence below is correct:

    Manufacturing paint requires high levels of both technical expertise and financial resources lacked by many would-be competitors.

Page 1 of 3 1 2 3 LastLast

Similar Threads

  1. [Grammar] something missing
    By Fiorentino in forum Ask a Teacher
    Replies: 1
    Last Post: 24-Oct-2010, 07:13
  2. 'lack of' or 'lacking'
    By Tvita in forum Ask a Teacher
    Replies: 1
    Last Post: 13-Sep-2009, 07:23
  3. what is the parts of speech of lacking?
    By kiranlegend in forum Ask a Teacher
    Replies: 3
    Last Post: 23-Aug-2008, 19:36
  4. Lacking vs Missing
    By juan_mexia in forum Ask a Teacher
    Replies: 1
    Last Post: 15-Apr-2008, 23:50
  5. the key that you lost/ have lost
    By joham in forum Ask a Teacher
    Replies: 1
    Last Post: 18-Mar-2008, 06:59

Bookmarks

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •