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  1. Debb
    Guest
    #1

    And vs. Or

    The earlier of one week and the Friday prior to

    or

    The earlier of one week or the Friday prior to


    • Join Date: Aug 2005
    • Posts: 6
    #2

    Lightbulb Re: And vs. Or

    The earlier of one week and the Friday prior to

    or

    The earlier of one week or the Friday prior to


    It matters if you are excluding or including the Friday. The first example would include the Friday, and the second excludes it. And includes and or excludes.

    example:

    'you may have cake and ice cream' meaning both can be had
    'you may have cake or ice cream' meaning you must choose one or the other

    let me know if this example helps, if not you may need to elaborate.

  2. Mister Micawber's Avatar
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      • Native Language:
      • English
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      • United States
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    • Join Date: Sep 2004
    • Posts: 1,857
    #3

    Re: And vs. Or

    .
    I don't quite see it that way. The phrase seems to offer a choice between two times, one week's duration and a specific Friday. It would be nice to have the complete sentence, something like:

    "Your homework is always due on the earlier of one week from the day it was assigned, and the Friday prior to the end of the month."

    The earlier of two times, which are listed: time A and time B. Logically it seems to me that it must be and-- a choice is offered between A and B.

    In spite of the logic, however, I automatically typed or in writing the first draft of my sample sentence.

    I suppose it is a matter of aspect: the choice itself is only one, A or B, while what are offered as choices are A and B.

    .

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