Results 1 to 8 of 8
    • Member Info
      • Native Language:
      • English
      • Home Country:
      • Canada
      • Current Location:
      • Switzerland

    • Join Date: Aug 2009
    • Posts: 1,676
    • Post Thanks / Like
    #1

    Hyphen

    "FIFA's player transfer rules."

    Shouldn't there be a hyphen between "player" and "transfer"?

    Thanks!

  1. bhaisahab's Avatar
    • Member Info
      • Native Language:
      • British English
      • Home Country:
      • England
      • Current Location:
      • England

    • Join Date: Apr 2008
    • Posts: 25,278
    • Post Thanks / Like
    #2

    Re: Hyphen

    Quote Originally Posted by Jasmin165 View Post
    "FIFA's player transfer rules."

    Shouldn't there be a hyphen between "player" and "transfer"?

    Thanks!
    Probably, yes.

    • Member Info
      • Native Language:
      • English
      • Home Country:
      • Canada
      • Current Location:
      • Canada

    • Join Date: Apr 2007
    • Posts: 4,146
    • Post Thanks / Like
    #3

    Re: Hyphen

    Quote Originally Posted by Jasmin165 View Post
    "FIFA's player transfer rules."

    Shouldn't there be a hyphen between "player" and "transfer"?

    Thanks!
    I think that 'probably, (leaning toward) yes', is on the right track.

    When trying to decide whether to use a hyphen or not between two adjectives, you need to decide whether the adjectives are each independently modifying the noun or whether they are working together in modifying the noun. The latter situation requires a hyphen.

    1) He enjoyed the hot sunny day.

    "hot"and "sunny" are independently modifying the noun "day". Of course you can have a day that is both hot and sunny, but you can also have hot cloudy days and cold sunny days. In all cases the two adjectives independently modify "day", so you don't use a hyphen.
    Another way you can know that you shouldn't use a hyphen is if you can add "and" between the two adjectives. which you can do in sentence 1).

    2) We need to hold a high-level meeting. The meeting is not high, nor is it level. So we need a hyphen to make the compoud adjective "high-level".

    3) FIFA's player ?- transfer rules
    The rules are certainly about players and they are certainly about transfers. But they are more precisely about player transfers. So I would use a hyphen: 'FIFA's player-transfer rules'.
    Last edited by 2006; 20-Jan-2011 at 06:56.

    • Member Info
      • Native Language:
      • Croatian
      • Home Country:
      • Croatia
      • Current Location:
      • Croatia

    • Join Date: Jan 2011
    • Posts: 4
    • Post Thanks / Like
    #4

    Re: Hyphen

    In "FIFA's player transfer rules", "player" and "transfer" are both nouns. They modify "rules" jointly (form and function). Not all attributive modifiers are adjectives. 2006 gave us a simplistic account of the use of hyphens, which, in the majority of cases but not in all cases, applicable.

    the most respected member (most and respected? - no!)
    the most-respected member

    Central American states
    Central-American states

    However,
    Afro-Cuban music
    Afro Cuban music

    Another way you can know that you shouldn't use a hyphen is if you can add "and" between the two adjectives.
    African-American people
    African American people

    The following compound adjectives are not normally hyphenated:
    Where there is no risk of ambiguity:
    "a Sunday morning walk"
    .
    .
    .
    FIFA's player transfer rules -- no ambiguity
    "FIFA's player-transfer rules"

    • Member Info
      • Native Language:
      • British English
      • Home Country:
      • UK
      • Current Location:
      • Laos

    • Join Date: Nov 2002
    • Posts: 52,321
    • Post Thanks / Like
    #5

    Re: Hyphen

    Quote Originally Posted by Discoverer1 View Post
    s a simplistic account of the use of hyphens, which, in the majority of cases but not in all cases, applicable.
    Simplistic could be regarded as impolite. Please be careful with such terms.

    • Member Info
      • Native Language:
      • English
      • Home Country:
      • Canada
      • Current Location:
      • Canada

    • Join Date: Apr 2007
    • Posts: 4,146
    • Post Thanks / Like
    #6

    Re: Hyphen

    Quote Originally Posted by Discoverer1 View Post
    In "FIFA's player transfer rules", "player" and "transfer" are both nouns. But they function as adjectives. They modify "rules" jointly If by that you mean that they work together, they should be hyphenated. (form and function). Not all attributive modifiers are adjectives.
    2006 gave us a simplistic account of the use of hyphens, which in the majority of cases but not in all cases is applicable. Perhaps you meant a basic account. It wasn't an exhaustive one, but it covered the main point of whether the adjectives work independently or together.

    the most respected member (most and respected? - no!)
    the most-respected member
    That "most" is an adverb, so the above example doesn't apply to the question of compound or independent adjectives.

    Another way you can know that you shouldn't use a hyphen is if you can add "and" between the two adjectives.
    The above guideline does not apply to all situations. It can be used by people who already have a good understanding of English and are deciding whether to use a hyphen to separate two adjectives.

    Central American states
    Central-American states This would be correct to describe states located in the middle of the USA.
    However,
    Afro-Cuban music
    Afro Cuban music
    I don't know what to say about the above, maybe because of "Afro".

    The following compound adjectives are not normally hyphenated:
    Where there is no risk of ambiguity:
    "a Sunday morning walk"
    They are not hyphenated because both adjectives independently modify "walk".

    African-American people
    African American people
    One sees both of the above. But I would hyphenate because their African heritage and American citizenship are tied together. It's not simply a matter of the two separate adjectives.

    FIFA's player transfer rules -- no ambiguity Maybe not in this case, but there could be examples that are ambiguous. More importantly, the two adjectives work together to modify "rules".
    "FIFA's player-transfer rules"
    2006
    Last edited by 2006; 20-Jan-2011 at 18:11. Reason: many small corrections and revisions

    • Member Info
      • Native Language:
      • British English
      • Home Country:
      • Great Britain
      • Current Location:
      • France

    • Join Date: Oct 2005
    • Posts: 78
    • Post Thanks / Like
    #7

    Re: Hyphen

    Try putting 'player transfer rules' or player-transfer rules' into Google.
    No hyphen will be found!!

  2. 5jj's Avatar
    • Member Info
      • Native Language:
      • British English
      • Home Country:
      • England
      • Current Location:
      • Czech Republic

    • Join Date: Oct 2010
    • Posts: 28,135
    • Post Thanks / Like
    #8

    Re: Hyphen

    Quote Originally Posted by Flittle View Post
    Try putting 'player transfer rules' or player-transfer rules' into Google. No hyphen will be found!!
    Try googling "I ain't". You'll get over two hundred million hits.
    Google is not a reliable source for telling us what is, or is not, acceptable.

Similar Threads

  1. hyphen
    By Allen165 in forum Ask a Teacher
    Replies: 5
    Last Post: 14-Apr-2010, 22:06
  2. hyphen
    By Allen165 in forum Ask a Teacher
    Replies: 2
    Last Post: 13-Feb-2010, 22:34
  3. hyphen
    By Allen165 in forum Ask a Teacher
    Replies: 6
    Last Post: 12-Nov-2009, 22:04
  4. hyphen
    By Allen165 in forum Ask a Teacher
    Replies: 3
    Last Post: 15-Oct-2009, 17:59
  5. Hyphen
    By Anonymous in forum Ask a Teacher
    Replies: 1
    Last Post: 19-Nov-2003, 19:44

Bookmarks

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •