Results 1 to 6 of 6
    • Member Info
      • Native Language:
      • Korean
      • Home Country:
      • South Korea
      • Current Location:
      • South Korea

    • Join Date: Jun 2007
    • Posts: 1,271
    #1

    ride

    Please set me clear on the following in red.

    1. One of my positions at IBM had been a senior manager at their largest hard-drive plant... It's a business no outsider should try to get into. You have to worry about substrates and mechanical arms and precision. They are devilishly hard products to design and manufacture. As just one item, the read-heads ride about a hair's width from the spinning disk; the tolerances in manufacture can be a nightmare. It's a very difficult task to build drives that work properly.

    Does "mechanical arms" refer to "arms of a robot"? And the second part is confusing. I know it's something technical, but would you please paraphrase it more easily? You don't have to explain the "read-head", but especially what does "ride" mean in the context?

    2. Most of them I assume were comfortable with the IBM culture; I never felt as if I quite fit in, even after going through their executive training program. I never got caught up in the typical business-executive kind of concerns.

    Does the above mean "I never did any work that a typical executive of a company is expected to do"?

    Thank you.

    • Member Info
      • Native Language:
      • English
      • Home Country:
      • UK
      • Current Location:
      • UK

    • Join Date: Jan 2011
    • Posts: 102
    #2

    Re: ride

    ***Not a teacher***

    The first two are technical terms. The excerpt you have quoted is full of references to computer hard drive manufacture.

    The drive functions by having rotating platters, which are very thin circular shaped magnetic disks, which spin very fast (several thousand revolutions per minute). Information is encoded onto the magnetic surface by passing an 'arm' across it. Data is read by a 'read head' and written by a 'write head'. You can check out some of the detail on wikipedia under the 'hard disk drive' article.

    Does "mechanical arms" refer to "arms of a robot"?
    ..therefore refers to the arm which moves just above the surface of the hard disk.

    To say the read head rides above the surface means to hover. The arm is held a minute distance ("a hair's width') above the rapidly rotating surface of the disk platter and can therefore be thought of as 'riding across the surface' - even though it is the platter that is rotating. The arm is moved back and forth across the surface of the platter to access different parts.

    I never got caught up in the typical business-executive kind of concerns.


    This means I never got excessively involved with the sorts of things that a business executive would normally get involved with.

    Ade

    • Member Info
      • Native Language:
      • Korean
      • Home Country:
      • South Korea
      • Current Location:
      • South Korea

    • Join Date: Jun 2007
    • Posts: 1,271
    #3

    Re: ride

    Quote Originally Posted by azcl View Post
    ***Not a teacher***

    The first two are technical terms. The excerpt you have quoted is full of references to computer hard drive manufacture.

    The drive functions by having rotating platters, which are very thin circular shaped magnetic disks, which spin very fast (several thousand revolutions per minute). Information is encoded onto the magnetic surface by passing an 'arm' across it. Data is read by a 'read head' and written by a 'write head'. You can check out some of the detail on wikipedia under the 'hard disk drive' article.


    ..therefore refers to the arm which moves just above the surface of the hard disk.

    To say the read head rides above the surface means to hover. The arm is held a minute distance ("a hair's width') above the rapidly rotating surface of the disk platter and can therefore be thought of as 'riding across the surface' - even though it is the platter that is rotating. The arm is moved back and forth across the surface of the platter to access different parts.



    This means I never got excessively involved with the sorts of things that a business executive would normally get involved with.

    Ade

    Thank you for the kind explanation.

    According to the the above in bold, It seems the read head refers to the arm. Are they the same in this context?

    • Member Info
      • Native Language:
      • American English
      • Home Country:
      • United States
      • Current Location:
      • United States

    • Join Date: Apr 2009
    • Posts: 12,307
    #4

    Re: ride

    Yes, the read head is on the arm. They are really like tiny airplane wings, made to achieve their loft in the same way an airplane does.

    • Member Info
      • Native Language:
      • English
      • Home Country:
      • UK
      • Current Location:
      • UK

    • Join Date: Jan 2011
    • Posts: 102
    #5

    Re: ride

    ***Not a teacher***

    Hello unpakwon

    According to the the above in bold, It seems the read head refers to the arm. Are they the same in this context?
    No, they are not the same. The read head is a small electronic component which is attached on the underside of the arm. The arm moves across the surface of the platters to mechanically position the head in the right place to read data from the magnetic platter.

    I hope that makes sense. Again, the 'Hard Disk Drive' article on wikipedia gives further details (where it refers to the arm as an 'actuator arm').

    Ade

    • Member Info
      • Native Language:
      • Korean
      • Home Country:
      • South Korea
      • Current Location:
      • South Korea

    • Join Date: Jun 2007
    • Posts: 1,271
    #6

    Re: ride

    Now I've got the picture.

    Thank you again.

Similar Threads

  1. ride a bike / ride bikes
    By sitifan in forum Ask a Teacher
    Replies: 3
    Last Post: 03-Mar-2010, 02:34
  2. Ride out
    By dilodi83 in forum Ask a Teacher
    Replies: 1
    Last Post: 17-Jan-2009, 14:35
  3. He's a ride
    By Cristina de Felipe in forum Ask a Teacher
    Replies: 8
    Last Post: 29-Aug-2008, 17:49
  4. Be taken for a ride
    By Bushwhacker in forum Ask a Teacher
    Replies: 2
    Last Post: 10-Jul-2007, 20:35
  5. Ride by, ride past and stop by
    By nicolas in forum Ask a Teacher
    Replies: 13
    Last Post: 22-Jan-2004, 12:41

Bookmarks

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •