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    #1

    "She don't care"

    Well, Today I was listening to the Beatles. The song "Ticket to ride" they sing "She's got a ticket to ride, but she don't care" I was wondering, shouldn't it be she doesn't care?

    Or this is just for the rythme? because "She doesn't care" might not go with the song?

    Thanks

  1. engee30's Avatar
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    #2

    Post Re: "She don't care"

    Quote Originally Posted by noppanit View Post
    Well, Today I was listening to the Beatles. The song "Ticket to ride" they sing "She's got a ticket to ride, but she don't care" I was wondering, shouldn't it be she doesn't care?

    Or this is just for the rythme? because "She doesn't care" might not go with the song?

    Thanks
    ♥♦♣♠ NOT A TEACHER ♥♦♣♠

    It does have something to do with the rhythm and lyrics of that song - don't has one syllable, whereas doesn't two. I guess it wouldn't fit well in the song with doesn't.

  2. bhaisahab's Avatar
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    #3

    Re: "She don't care"

    Quote Originally Posted by noppanit View Post
    Well, Today I was listening to the Beatles. The song "Ticket to ride" they sing "She's got a ticket to ride, but she don't care" I was wondering, shouldn't it be she doesn't care?

    Or this is just for the rhythm? because "She doesn't care" might not go with the song?

    Thanks
    Yes, that's right. Songwriters often use non-standard English in that way.

  3. BobK's Avatar
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    #4

    Re: "She don't care"

    Quote Originally Posted by noppanit View Post
    Well, Today I was listening to the Beatles. The song "Ticket to ride" they sing "She's got a ticket to ride, but she don't care" I was wondering, shouldn't it be she doesn't care?

    Or this is just for the rhythme? because "She doesn't care" might not go with the song?

    Thanks
    Partly rhythm, partly colloquial usage. And Lennon&McCartney's main musical inflences at the time - a lot of their stuff was 'standards' like Long Tall Sally, Matchbox, Chains... sung originally by African-American blues singers who would have said 'don'' (listen again; as I remember it was /ʃi:dəʊŋkeə/).

    b

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    #5

    Re: "She don't care"

    ***Neither a teacher nor a native speaker.***

    "S/he don't..." is very common for songs.
    I'm sure you will hear it many times.
    (Of course this doesn't make it correct, though. )

    Cheers!

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    #6

    Re: "She don't care"

    Big thanks, that helps a lot.

  5. Ouisch's Avatar
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    #7

    Re: "She don't care"

    Quote Originally Posted by noppanit View Post
    Well, Today I was listening to the Beatles. The song "Ticket to ride" they sing "She's got a ticket to ride, but she don't care" I was wondering, shouldn't it be she doesn't care?

    Or this is just for the rythme? because "She doesn't care" might not go with the song?

    Thanks
    You are right - to be grammatically correct, the line should have been "she doesn't care." In the same vein, Ringo's solo hit "It Don't Come Easy" should properly have been "It Doesn't Come Easy". But (as I've told my students many times) while song lyrics can be a pleasant/easy way of learning English words, they are not necessarily the place to learn proper grammar. Song writers not only abuse the rules of grammar and sentence structure when composing a tune, they'll also make up words or implausible situations, all in the name of creativity. My 86-year-old Dad is a huge Neil Diamond fan, so two of Neil's tunes immediately come to my mind as examples:

    From "Play Me":
    Song she sang to me
    Song she brang to me
    Words that rang in me
    Rhyme that sprang from me
    Warmed the night
    And what was right
    Became me .


    "Brang" is NOT an English word. And the proper past tense of "spring" is "sprung".... But it fit his rhyming pattern, so what the heck.

    While we're on the topic of Neil Diamond, I must present my personal bęte noire when it comes to his lyrics...from the classic "I Am, I Said":

    "I am," I said
    To no one there
    An no one heard at all
    Not even the chair.


    The chair didn't hear him? Does Mr. Diamond have unusually intelligent furniture?! I can't recall any occasion when my La-Z-Boy ever cautioned me "Whoah, I heard that!"

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    #8

    Re: "She don't care"

    "I'm walking on sunshine...

    And don't it feel good!"

    is another offender.

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    #9

    Re: "She don't care"

    Mind you, the old John Leyton song Son, this is she may be on pedants' playlists, but I think would have sounded better if he had been less hidebound with his grammar.

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    #10

    Re: "She don't care"

    Quote Originally Posted by Ouisch View Post

    The chair didn't hear him? Does Mr. Diamond have unusually intelligent furniture?!
    If walls can have ears, I can't see why chairs can't be deaf.

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