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    #1

    Disapply

    According to Wiktionary, "disapply" means to decline to apply a rule or law that previously applied (disapply - Wiktionary).

    But can it simply mean "stop applying"? Would, for example, "inconsistent national legislation must be disapplied" be correct?

    Thanks!

  1. 5jj's Avatar
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    #2

    Re: Disapply

    Your link led me to a word I had not seeen or heard before. I would not recommend that you use it in everyday speaking or writing.

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    #3

    Re: Disapply

    Quote Originally Posted by fivejedjon View Post
    Your link led me to a word I had not seeen or heard before. I would not recommend that you use it in everyday speaking or writing.
    Hahaha. I know it's not used in everyday English, and it may be confined to legal contexts. But I really like it, although I wouldn't use it in everyday life.

    I think it can also mean "stop applying," which makes sense given that "disapply" is the opposite of "apply."

    http://oxforddictionaries.com/definition/disapply

    http://eortrial.co.uk/default.aspx?id=1129210

    The above links seem to support my view.
    Last edited by Allen165; 22-Jan-2011 at 19:52.

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