Page 1 of 2 1 2 LastLast
Results 1 to 10 of 13
  1. milan2003_07's Avatar
    • Member Info
      • Native Language:
      • Russian
      • Home Country:
      • Russian Federation
      • Current Location:
      • Russian Federation

    • Join Date: Jan 2011
    • Posts: 519
    #1

    Based

    Hello,

    Management makes evaluations, grants salary increases, and promotes individuals based on what it receives

    Does "based" refer to "management" here? Is it (the participle "based") an attribute, an adverbial modifier or part of a predicate? I think it's an adverbial modifier, but I'm not sure.

    Best


    • Member Info
      • Native Language:
      • Polish
      • Home Country:
      • Poland
      • Current Location:
      • Poland

    • Join Date: Jul 2010
    • Posts: 5,098
    #2

    Re: Based

    Quote Originally Posted by milan2003_07 View Post
    Hello,

    Management makes evaluations, grants salary increases, and promotes individuals based on what it receives

    Does "based" refer to "management" here? Is it (the participle "based") an attribute, an adverbial modifier or part of a predicate? I think it's an adverbial modifier, but I'm not sure.

    Best

    I also think it's an adverbial. I think if "based on" weren't a fixed expression, we could use "basing on" there. Or maybe we can anyway? I'm not sure.

  2. 5jj's Avatar
    • Member Info
      • Native Language:
      • British English
      • Home Country:
      • England
      • Current Location:
      • Czech Republic

    • Join Date: Oct 2010
    • Posts: 28,134
    #3

    Re: Based

    Quote Originally Posted by milan2003_07 View Post

    Management makes evaluations, grants salary increases, and promotes individuals based on what it receives

    Does "based" refer to "management" here? Is it (the participle "based") an attribute, an adverbial modifier or part of a predicate? I think it's an adverbial modifier, but I'm not sure.
    You can regard it either as an adjective, or as a past participle with a passive meaning. In either case, the making of evaluations, granting of salary increases and promotion of individuals are based on whatever it is that management receives.

    If you used 'basing' (active), you would have to say 'basing its decisions on what it receives'. It would then be management which is basing its decisions on whatever it is that it receives.

    • Member Info
      • Native Language:
      • Polish
      • Home Country:
      • Poland
      • Current Location:
      • Poland

    • Join Date: Jul 2010
    • Posts: 5,098
    #4

    Re: Based

    I dont see this. Are you saying that "based" can be considered an adjective modifying the finite verb "promotes"?

  3. 5jj's Avatar
    • Member Info
      • Native Language:
      • British English
      • Home Country:
      • England
      • Current Location:
      • Czech Republic

    • Join Date: Oct 2010
    • Posts: 28,134
    #5

    Re: Based

    Quote Originally Posted by birdeen's call View Post
    I dont see this. Are you saying that "based" can be considered an adjective modifying the finite verb "promotes"?
    No.

    We can consider that the adjective qualifies either the evaluations, salary increases and promotions, or the making of evaluations, granting of salary increases and promotion of individuals.

    That the word I have underlined are not actually used suggests that, to a purist, the sentence should ideally be recast. One suggestion would be:

    Management makes evaluations, grants salary increases, and promotes individuals, these decisions being based on what it receives
    .

    The sentence is poorly constructed anyway; we don't know what is referred to in 'what it receives'

    • Member Info
      • Native Language:
      • Polish
      • Home Country:
      • Poland
      • Current Location:
      • Poland

    • Join Date: Jul 2010
    • Posts: 5,098
    #6

    Re: Based

    Quote Originally Posted by fivejedjon View Post
    No.

    We can consider that the adjective qualifies either the evaluations, salary increases and promotions, or the making of evaluations, granting of salary increases and promotion of individuals.

    That the word I have underlined are not actually used suggests that, to a purist, the sentence should ideally be recast.
    But such sentences are used... I doesn't seem very logical to me either but isn't it just a fixed expression?

    I was unable to find much help on the web but here's something I found:
    adverb Copyediting Blog

  4. 5jj's Avatar
    • Member Info
      • Native Language:
      • British English
      • Home Country:
      • England
      • Current Location:
      • Czech Republic

    • Join Date: Oct 2010
    • Posts: 28,134
    #7

    Re: Based

    Quote Originally Posted by birdeen's call View Post
    But such sentences are used... I doesn't seem very logical to me either but isn't it just a fixed expression?

    I was unable to find much help on the web but here's something I found:
    adverb Copyediting Blog
    You could be right. Thanks for the link.

    I have to say that I saw nothing wrong with the sentence (other than the what it receives) when I first read it. Indeed, I still don't, really.

    Perhaps my recasting for the purist was based on a failure to recognise that this expression can be used adverbially.

  5. milan2003_07's Avatar
    • Member Info
      • Native Language:
      • Russian
      • Home Country:
      • Russian Federation
      • Current Location:
      • Russian Federation

    • Join Date: Jan 2011
    • Posts: 519
    #8

    Re: Based

    Thanks for the conytributions, but I still can't figure out whether "based" is an attribute, part of a predicate or an adverbial modifier. I incline to the latter, but the more I read opinions, the more I doubt.

    Best

  6. 5jj's Avatar
    • Member Info
      • Native Language:
      • British English
      • Home Country:
      • England
      • Current Location:
      • Czech Republic

    • Join Date: Oct 2010
    • Posts: 28,134
    #9

    Re: Based

    Quote Originally Posted by milan2003_07 View Post
    Thanks for the contributions, but I still can't figure out whether "based" is an attribute, part of a predicate or an adverbial modifier. I incline to the latter, but the more I read opinions, the more I doubt.
    Is the label that important?

    It's is often difficult to decide how a word like 'tired' or 'bored' or, in this case 'based', should be labelled.

    Is 'I am bored' an example of a present tense passive construction of the verb BORE, or is it a present tense construction of the verb BE followed by the adjective bored? Does it matter?

    Don't forget that adjectives and past participles and adverbial modifiers do not exist in real life - they are simply labels that we apply to words to help us understand how people use these words.

    The only important question for learners, I feel, is whether or not based on can be used adverbially. BC's link suggests that some people are using it in this way, a suggestion reinforced for me when I took a quick look at a couple of corpora. I suspect that this is one of those cases where some people will feel strongly that this is 'incorrect', others that it is now acceptable.

  7. milan2003_07's Avatar
    • Member Info
      • Native Language:
      • Russian
      • Home Country:
      • Russian Federation
      • Current Location:
      • Russian Federation

    • Join Date: Jan 2011
    • Posts: 519
    #10

    Re: Based

    Quote Originally Posted by fivejedjon View Post
    Is the label that important?

    It's is often difficult to decide how a word like 'tired' or 'bored' or, in this case 'based', should be labelled.

    Is 'I am bored' an example of a present tense passive construction of the verb BORE, or is it a present tense construction of the verb BE followed by the adjective bored? Does it matter?

    Don't forget that adjectives and past participles and adverbial modifiers do not exist in real life - they are simply labels that we apply to words to help us understand how people use these words.

    The only important question for learners, I feel, is whether or not based on can be used adverbially. BC's link suggests that some people are using it in this way, a suggestion reinforced for me when I took a quick look at a couple of corpora. I suspect that this is one of those cases where some people will feel strongly that this is 'incorrect', others that it is now acceptable.
    Dear friend!!!

    Yes, the label is very important for me now, because I'm studying (rather revising) participles and their function in sentences. I'd like to ask you just to leave your opinion, your assumption about whether "based" is an attribute, adverbal modifier or part of a predicate. I need this to understand the construction better.

    Thanks

Page 1 of 2 1 2 LastLast

Similar Threads

  1. based on the ...
    By GUEST2008 in forum Ask a Teacher
    Replies: 1
    Last Post: 29-Mar-2009, 23:42
  2. [Grammar] based on...
    By yeamaozi in forum Ask a Teacher
    Replies: 3
    Last Post: 27-Feb-2009, 02:28
  3. Replies: 2
    Last Post: 28-Dec-2008, 09:19
  4. based off
    By user_gary in forum Ask a Teacher
    Replies: 3
    Last Post: 06-Oct-2008, 16:07
  5. based on
    By jiang in forum Ask a Teacher
    Replies: 2
    Last Post: 28-Mar-2006, 15:05

Bookmarks

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •