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    #1

    "in...to" = "from...to" ??

    In these cases, "in the....to" has exactly the same meaning as "from...to"?? (Showing a range)


    1 - "In men, hair loss starts in the late teens to mid-twenties" = "In men, hair loss starts from the late teens to mid-twenties" ???

    2 - "Acne usually begins in the early teen years and subsides in the late teens to mid-twenties" = "Acne usually begins in the early teen years and subsides from the late teens to mid-twenties" ???

    When I use, "In men, hair loss starts in the late teens to mid-twenties", I'm saying that the start of hair loss is higher at the late teens than early twenties and mid-twenties? Or I'm saying that the start of hair loss can also occur both in early teens, in early twenties and the mid-twenties?

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    #2

    Re: "in...to" = "from...to" ??

    "When I use, "In men, hair loss starts in the late teens to mid-twenties", I'm saying that the start of hair loss is higher at the late teens than early twenties and mid-twenties? Or I'm saying that the start of hair loss can also occur both in early teens, in early twenties and the mid-twenties?"

    Your statement does not suggest greater hair loss at any of the three stages you reference later. It simply says that hair is lost in these time periods; it does not suggest a greater problem in one or the other.

    As for in/from, it depends on the subject: tulips start blooming IN the spring, or ON March21, but you will see flowers FROM spring or FROM March 21 UNTIL fall.

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    #3

    Re: "in...to" = "from...to" ??

    So, when I use, "In men, hair loss starts in the late teens to mid-twenties", I'm saying that the start of hair loss, can also occur both in early teens, in early twenties or in the mid-twenties?

    In other words, in this case, "In men, hair loss starts in the late teens to mid-twenties" = "In men, hair loss starts from the late teens to mid-twenties" ???

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    #4

    Re: "in...to" = "from...to" ??

    "In men, hair loss starts in the late teens to mid-twenties" = "In men, hair loss starts from the late teens to mid-twenties"

    Hi Breno. The sentence is saying that most men START to lose their hair at some point between their late teens and mid-twenties. For some men the starting point is early in that period, for some it happens later. One could say that a "start" is at a point or moment of beginning and so "in...to" is more appropriate, but both hair loss and acne tend to develop gradually and so in both cases "from...to" could feel just as apt, suggesting a beginning taking place over a period of time.

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    #5

    Re: "in...to" = "from...to" ??

    "Hi Breno. The sentence is saying that most men START to lose their hair at some point between their late teens and mid-twenties."

    Which of two sentences you're referring to?

    "In men, hair loss starts in the late teens to mid-twenties" OR "In men, hair loss starts from the late teens to mid-twenties" ??

    When I want to say that most men start to lose their hair at some point between their late teens and mid-twenties, which the sentence is the most appropriate??

    "In men, hair loss starts in the late teens to mid-twenties" OR "In men, hair loss starts from the late teens to mid-twenties" ??

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    #6

    Re: "in...to" = "from...to" ??

    "The sentence is saying that most men START to lose their hair at some point between their late teens and mid-twenties."
    Which of two sentences you're referring to?
    "In men, hair loss starts in the late teens to mid-twenties" OR "In men, hair loss starts from the late teens to mid-twenties" ??


    Hi breno, sorry if I didn't make my point clearly enough. Both sentences convey very much the same meaning, that men start to lose their hair during that period in their life. The first sentence (in...to) is entirely appropriate for expressing this idea.

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