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Thread: 2 questions.

  1. Junior Member
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    #1

    Question 2 questions.

    1) How do you pronounce I'm, I'll, you're, we're, they're? Sometimes I hear that you're is pronounced as your. Instead of [aɪm] I hear [am].

    2) I often hear that the word "fantasy" is pronounced as [fnəsɪ], that is without [t].
    What other words can be pronounced this way?

  2. BobK's Avatar
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    #2

    Re: 2 questions.

    Quote Originally Posted by TheNewOne View Post
    1) How do you pronounce I'm, I'll, you're, we're, they're? Sometimes I hear that you're is pronounced as your. Instead of [aɪm] I hear [am].

    2) I often hear that the word "fantasy" is pronounced as [fnəsɪ], that is without [t].
    What other words can be pronounced this way?
    1 You're right about /aɪm/. In some variants it comes nearer to [a:m] - often written, in what is called 'eye' dialect', as "Ah'm". 'You're' is mostly /jɔ:/ (as is 'your'), but some variants pronounce the first part like a 'you' standing alone; they also (in Scottish English) pronounce the 'r' as [r] (perhaps with a slight trill): [ju:r] (this follows a general tendency in Scotland to preserve vowels followed by r: ['stəʊri], for example (for 'story')). Some variants also have /jʊə/. 'We're' is /wɪə/, and 'they're' is sometimes /eə/ and sometimes /eɪə/ (depending on how careful the speech is).

    When I say 'is' I mean 'that is the version that will be widely understood by most British Eng Speakers, that is pronounced that way by a significant number of them in formal contexts, and that is expected in all ELT exams'. 'Standard British English' is a theoretical construct, to which most speech approximates - especially in formal contexts - and from which some speech differs wildly. Melvyn Bragg, presenter of The Adventures of English - credited as the author, but [a heɪ ma dyts] as they say in Scotland - reports that when he was at school in Yorkshire he would say to his friends [az 'gaŋən jam] when to a teacher he would say 'I'm going home'.)

    2 The /t/ is often dropped in less careful speech, more commonly - I think - in Am Eng.


    b

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    #3

    Re: 2 questions.

    Quote Originally Posted by TheNewOne View Post
    1) How do you pronounce I'm, I'll, you're, we're, they're? Sometimes I hear that you're is pronounced as your. Instead of [aɪm] I hear [am].
    I'm - /aɪm/
    I'll - /aɪ(ə)l/
    you're = your - /jɚ, ju(ə)r, jo˞/
    we're - /wɪ(ə)r, wɚ, wi(ə)r/
    they're = there = their - /e(ə)r, (unstressed) ɚ /

    In some dialects, as BobK said, the diphthong /aɪ/ becomes /aː/.
    2) I often hear that the word "fantasy" is pronounced as [fnəsɪ], that is without [t].
    What other words can be pronounced this way?
    When the "t" is after an "n" and before /ə/ or /ɚ/.

    Example internet /ɪnɚnɛt/, dentist /dɛnəst/, interview /ɪnɚvju:/, international /ɪnɚnʃnəl/.

    It's common in AmE in everyday speech (I wouldn't classify it as uncareful), but the "t" may be preserved in more formal contexts.

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    #4

    Re: 2 questions.

    BobK
    thatone

    Thank you for answering!

    Example internet /ɪnɚnɛt/, dentist /dɛnəst/, interview /ɪnɚvju:/, international /ɪnɚnʃnəl/.
    Internet and international sound weird to me because of nɚnɛ

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    #5

    Re: 2 questions.

    Quote Originally Posted by TheNewOne View Post
    Internet and international sound weird to me because of nɚnɛ
    Well, it's basically like saying "inner" instead of "inter."

  6. BobK's Avatar
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    #6

    Re: 2 questions.

    Quote Originally Posted by TheNewOne View Post
    BobK
    thatone

    Thank you for answering!


    Internet and international sound weird to me because of nɚnɛ
    - to me too, but it happens a lot - even in Br English (which tends to preserve the /t/ when pronouncin 'nt' more than American Eng does.

    b

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