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    #1

    difference?

    1)"I could never do the scar revision that clean."

    OR

    2)"I never could have done the scar revision that clean."

    If I want to say that my colleague is realy good at doing the scar revision, which sentence is more appropriate? I guess the difference is that if I say 1) it means that it will take more practice to be his equal, whereas 2) means no matter how hard I try I'll never be as good as he is. Am I correct?

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    #2

    Re: difference?

    No; the second refers to an instance in the past when they did a particularly clean scar revision. I would use the first, but use cleanly.

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    #3

    Re: difference?

    Quote Originally Posted by ostap77 View Post
    1)"I could never do the scar revision that clean."

    OR

    2)"I never could have done the scar revision that clean."

    If I want to say that my colleague is realy good at doing the scar revision, which sentence is more appropriate? I guess the difference is that if I say 1) it means that it will take more practice to be his equal, whereas 2) means no matter how hard I try I'll never be as good as he is. Am I correct?
    To me, 1. tends to mean "I will never be able to do a scar revision that cleanly (and never have been able to.)"
    This "couldn't" doesn't just refer to the past, but also the future, as in:
    "I couldn't do that in a million years!"; "I could never do that, no matter how hard I tried."

    2. refers to the past. So there is hope for you yet.
    "I never could have done the scar revision that cleanly, until I studied with him."

    So your interpretations are reversed.

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