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  1. Mehrgan's Avatar
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    #1

    Question "hasty" for humans?

    Hi,
    Can we use "hasty" to refer, negatively, to a person who tries to be quick but makes problems?


    Ta!

  2. Barb_D's Avatar
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    #2

    Re: "hasty" for humans?

    I think you will see "hasty" applied to actions rather than people.

    It's not impossible, and I welcome suggested sentences from others showing its use, but I would say "His act was too hasty" rather than "He was too hasty."
    I'm not a teacher, but I write for a living. Please don't ask me about 2nd conditionals, but I'm a safe bet for what reads well in (American) English.

  3. Mehrgan's Avatar
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    #3

    Re: "hasty" for humans?

    Quote Originally Posted by Barb_D View Post
    I think you will see "hasty" applied to actions rather than people.

    It's not impossible, and I welcome suggested sentences from others showing its use, but I would say "His act was too hasty" rather than "He was too hasty."


    Thanks a lot. What can we use in a sentence like 'Try to be quick but but not ....'?
    So, I cannot use 'hasty' in this case.

  4. Barb_D's Avatar
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    #4

    Re: "hasty" for humans?

    That would be a good example of when it would make sense.

    Be quick, but don't be too hasty. = Act quickly, but not too hastily.

    I think yours would be fine with hasty in that sentence.
    I'm not a teacher, but I write for a living. Please don't ask me about 2nd conditionals, but I'm a safe bet for what reads well in (American) English.

  5. 5jj's Avatar
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    #5

    Re: "hasty" for humans?

    Quote Originally Posted by Mehrgan View Post
    Thanks a lot. What can we use in a sentence like 'Try to be quick but not ....'?
    So, I cannot use 'hasty' in this case.
    The simple answer is, 'Try to be quick, but not too quick'.

    I think we can use 'hasty' of people, so long as we relate it to actions:

    I think I am a bit hasty in answering questions.

  6. bhaisahab's Avatar
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    #6

    Re: "hasty" for humans?

    This is funny (at least I think so). Wait till the end, it is relevant I promise.YouTube - 'RIGHT SAID FRED' - BERNARD CRIBBINS 1960s Animated Video

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