Results 1 to 9 of 9

Thread: help

  1. Newbie
    English Teacher
    • Member Info
      • Native Language:
      • Spanish
      • Home Country:
      • Spain
      • Current Location:
      • Spain

    • Join Date: Jan 2011
    • Posts: 2
    #1

    help

    Is it correct to say "I have got a terrible time"
    Thank you

  2. 5jj's Avatar
    VIP Member
    Retired English Teacher
    • Member Info
      • Native Language:
      • British English
      • Home Country:
      • England
      • Current Location:
      • Czech Republic

    • Join Date: Oct 2010
    • Posts: 28,134
    #2

    Re: help

    Quote Originally Posted by ecoto View Post
    Is it correct to say "I have got a terrible time"
    No.

    I have a terrible time (when I visit my mother-in-law)
    I am having a terrible time (at present).


    You can use 'have got' only when it denotes some idea of possession:

    I have (got) a new car.

  3. Khosro's Avatar
    Senior Member
    Interested in Language
    • Member Info
      • Native Language:
      • Persian
      • Home Country:
      • Iran
      • Current Location:
      • Iran

    • Join Date: Jan 2011
    • Posts: 530
    #3

    Re: help

    I learn English and at the same time I teach English.
    --------------------------------------------------

    You can use 'have got' only when it denotes some idea of possession:

    Fivejedjon is right. You can not use "have got" here. But "Have got" is not only for "Some idea of possession".
    Last edited by Khosro; 28-Jan-2011 at 12:42.

  4. 5jj's Avatar
    VIP Member
    Retired English Teacher
    • Member Info
      • Native Language:
      • British English
      • Home Country:
      • England
      • Current Location:
      • Czech Republic

    • Join Date: Oct 2010
    • Posts: 28,134
    #4

    Re: help

    Quote Originally Posted by Khosro View Post
    But "Have got" is not only for "Some idea of possession".
    Can you give some examples, please?

  5. Khosro's Avatar
    Senior Member
    Interested in Language
    • Member Info
      • Native Language:
      • Persian
      • Home Country:
      • Iran
      • Current Location:
      • Iran

    • Join Date: Jan 2011
    • Posts: 530
    #5

    Re: help

    I learn English and at the same time teach English.
    ------------------------------------------------
    -- She's got her hair tied up in a bun today.
    -- He'd got the book open in front of him.
    (For showing how something is placed or arranged).

    But also: "You've got to show your passport" (If we are allowed to place "have to" under the heading "have").

  6. 5jj's Avatar
    VIP Member
    Retired English Teacher
    • Member Info
      • Native Language:
      • British English
      • Home Country:
      • England
      • Current Location:
      • Czech Republic

    • Join Date: Oct 2010
    • Posts: 28,134
    #6

    Re: help

    Quote Originally Posted by Khosro View Post
    1. -- She's got her hair tied up in a bun today.
    2. -- He'd got the book open in front of him.
    (For showing how something is placed or arranged).

    But also: 3. "You've got to show your passport" (If we are allowed to place "have to" under the heading "have").
    When I read sentences #1 and #2, I understand why you were unhappy with my "You can use 'have got' only when it denotes some idea of possession". However, I still feel that these situations are covered by 'some idea of possession', a wording I chose deliberately for its vagueness. If I had been writing a chapter, rather than a brief post, I would have expanded my answer.

    #3 is different. I, and many writers on grammar, consider the verb have (got) to to be a distinct verb that has nothing to do with have in modern English.

  7. bhaisahab's Avatar
    Moderator
    Retired English Teacher
    • Member Info
      • Native Language:
      • British English
      • Home Country:
      • England
      • Current Location:
      • Ireland

    • Join Date: Apr 2008
    • Posts: 26,076
    #7

    Re: help

    Quote Originally Posted by fivejedjon View Post
    When I read sentences #1 and #2, I understand why you were unhappy with my "You can use 'have got' only when it denotes some idea of possession". However, I still feel that these situations are covered by 'some idea of possession', a wording I chose deliberately for its vagueness. If I had been writing a chapter, rather than a brief post, I would have expanded my answer.

    #3 is different. I, and many writers on grammar, consider the verb have (got) to to be a distinct verb that has nothing to do with have in modern English.
    I can't see why "got" is necessary (or indeed desirable) in #1 and #2 "She has her hair tied up...", "He has the book open in front of him".

  8. 5jj's Avatar
    VIP Member
    Retired English Teacher
    • Member Info
      • Native Language:
      • British English
      • Home Country:
      • England
      • Current Location:
      • Czech Republic

    • Join Date: Oct 2010
    • Posts: 28,134
    #8

    Re: help

    Quote Originally Posted by bhaisahab View Post
    I can't see why "got" is necessary (or indeed desirable) in #1 and #2 "She has her hair tied up...", "He has the book open in front of him".
    I agree, but I have to admit that some people would say it.

  9. Khosro's Avatar
    Senior Member
    Interested in Language
    • Member Info
      • Native Language:
      • Persian
      • Home Country:
      • Iran
      • Current Location:
      • Iran

    • Join Date: Jan 2011
    • Posts: 530
    #9

    Re: help

    I learn English and at the same time I teach English.
    --------------------------------------------------

    you are right Fivejedjon. Even in those 2 examples I wrote there is a "she" and and "he" and not just "how something is placed or arranged".

    thank you

Bookmarks

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •