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    #1

    Almost everyone

    Almost ____ in the family likes to eat ice cream.
    (A) everyone (B) no one (C) anyone
    The answer is option A. Why is option B ungrammatical?

  1. Raymott's Avatar
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    #2

    Re: Almost everyone

    Quote Originally Posted by sitifan View Post
    Almost ____ in the family likes to eat ice cream.
    (A) everyone (B) no one (C) anyone
    The answer is option A. Why is option B ungrammatical?
    It isn't.

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    #3

    Re: Almost everyone

    ***Not a teacher***

    Almost ____ in the family likes to eat ice cream.
    (A) everyone (B) no one (C) anyone
    The answer is option A. Why is option B ungrammatical?
    This is a good question. 'Hardly anyone in the family likes to eat ice cream' would be a much more common construction.

    I think the reason (B) would not be considered grammatically correct is because of the use of 'almost'. Almost is generally used to mean 'nearly as much as'.

    "Almost all the DIY projects I have undertaken this year have ended in disaster."

    The etymology (from dictionary.com) is:
    O.E. eallmζst , lit. "mostly all," compound of eal, al "all" + mζst "most."

    So it is not really correct to say "mostly all of no one/nothing".

    Ade

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    #4

    Smile Re: Almost everyone

    Quote Originally Posted by azcl View Post
    ***Not a teacher***



    This is a good question. 'Hardly anyone in the family likes to eat ice cream' would be a much more common construction.

    I think the reason (B) would not be considered grammatically correct is because of the use of 'almost'. Almost is generally used to mean 'nearly as much as'.

    "Almost all the DIY projects I have undertaken this year have ended in disaster."

    The etymology (from dictionary.com) is:
    O.E. eallmζst , lit. "mostly all," compound of eal, al "all" + mζst "most."

    So it is not really correct to say "mostly all of no one/nothing".

    Ade
    ♥♦♣♠ NOT TEACHER ♥♦♣♠

    It seems that logic can't win practice. Here's an excerpt from OALD:

    •••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••• ••••••••••••••••••••••••••
    almost / nearly / practically
    These three words have similar meanings [...]
    They are used in positive sentences: She almost / nearly / practically missed her train. They can be used before words like all, every and everybody: Nearly all the students have bikes. ◙ I’ve got practically every CD they’ve made. Practically is used more in spoken than in written English. Nearly is the most common with numbers: There were nearly 200 people at the meeting. They can also be used in negative sentences but it is more common to make a positive sentence with only just: We only just got there in time. (or: We almost / nearly didn’t get there in time.)
    Almost and practically can be used before words like any, anybody, anything, etc.: I’ll eat almost anything. You can also use them before no, nobody, never, etc. but it is much more common to use hardly or scarcely with any, anybody, ever, etc.: She’s hardly ever in (or: She’s almost never in). [...]
    •••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••• ••••••••••••••••••••••••••

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    #5

    Re: Almost everyone

    What is "OALD" engee30?

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    #6

    Re: Almost everyone

    Quote Originally Posted by Khosro View Post
    What is "OALD" engee30?
    "Oxford Advanced Learners Dictionary".

  5. Khosro's Avatar
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    #7

    Re: Almost everyone

    Quote Originally Posted by bhaisahab View Post
    "Oxford Advanced Learners Dictionary".
    Thank you!

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    #8

    Re: Almost everyone

    Quote Originally Posted by engee30 View Post
    Almost and practically can be used before words like any, anybody, anything, etc.: I’ll eat almost anything. You can also use them before no, nobody, never, etc. but it is much more common to use hardly or scarcely with any, anybody, ever, etc.: She’s hardly ever in (or: She’s almost never in). [...]
    •••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••• ••••••••••••••••••••••••••
    Nice work. The bit you've underlined explains why the answer is A; but the bit in blue explains that B is also grammatical.
    Yet, we weren't given the question. I think that in these questions, the question usually is "Which is the best answer?", in which case, it's a good question.
    If the question were "Which is grammatical?", then it's not a valid test.

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