Page 1 of 2 1 2 LastLast
Results 1 to 10 of 12
    • Member Info
      • Native Language:
      • Russian
      • Home Country:
      • Russian Federation
      • Current Location:
      • Ukraine

    • Join Date: Oct 2010
    • Posts: 994
    #1

    time expressions

    Hello,

    I'm having some problems with time expressions. My book states we say "on Monday" when we talk about both a specific Moday and Mondays in general. We say 'on Mondays" when we talk about Modays in general, which is obvious. I'm wondering if this is the case with other time expressions. For example:

    in the evening - can we use it to talk about evenings in general?
    He ususally reads the newspaper in the evening.

    on Monday evening - can we use it to talk about every evening on Mondays?
    He always goes to the gym on Monday evening

    at the weekend -can we use it to talk about weekends in general?
    I always hang out with my friends at the weekend.

    I guess it doesn't work for "on workdays', right?

    Thank you in advance.

  1. opa6x57's Avatar
    • Member Info
      • Native Language:
      • American English
      • Home Country:
      • United States
      • Current Location:
      • United States

    • Join Date: Jul 2009
    • Posts: 139
    #2

    Re: time expressions

    Quote Originally Posted by Verona_82 View Post
    Hello,

    I'm having some problems with time expressions. My book states we say "on Monday" when we talk about both a specific Moday and Mondays in general. We say 'on Mondays" when we talk about Modays in general, which is obvious. I'm wondering if this is the case with other time expressions. For example:

    in the evening - can we use it to talk about evenings in general?
    He ususally reads the newspaper in the evening.

    on Monday evening - can we use it to talk about every evening on Mondays?
    He always goes to the gym on Monday evening

    at the weekend -can we use it to talk about weekends in general?
    I always hang out with my friends at the weekend. (I would say, I always hang out with my friends ON the weekends.)

    I guess it doesn't work for "on workdays', right?
    "I stop by the coffee shop on workdays." (I usually don't stop by the coffee shop on weekends.)
    Thank you in advance.

    You're welcome...



    =============================
    Not a teacher, 53-year-old American.
    =============================
    Ö and thatís my opinion

  2. apex2000's Avatar
    • Member Info
      • Native Language:
      • English
      • Home Country:
      • UK
      • Current Location:
      • Wales

    • Join Date: Nov 2005
    • Posts: 785
    #3

    Re: time expressions

    At the weekend.
    On the weekend.
    Both are acceptable.
    On workdays is also right.

  3. 5jj's Avatar
    • Member Info
      • Native Language:
      • British English
      • Home Country:
      • England
      • Current Location:
      • Czech Republic

    • Join Date: Oct 2010
    • Posts: 28,134
    #4

    Re: time expressions

    Quote Originally Posted by opa6x57 View Post
    at the weekend -can we use it to talk about weekends in general?
    I always hang out with my friends at the weekend. (I would say, I always hang out with my friends ON the weekends.)
    I agree with all of opa's ticks and crosses except the one above. In BrE, the normal expression is 'at the weekend', so Verona's sentence is acceptable to me.

    • Member Info
      • Native Language:
      • Polish
      • Home Country:
      • Poland
      • Current Location:
      • Poland

    • Join Date: Jul 2010
    • Posts: 5,098
    #5

    Re: time expressions

    Is the following good? It doesn't sound right to me but it seems grammatically correct.

    He usually reads the newspaper evenings.

    What it wrong with this sentence if anything?

  4. 5jj's Avatar
    • Member Info
      • Native Language:
      • British English
      • Home Country:
      • England
      • Current Location:
      • Czech Republic

    • Join Date: Oct 2010
    • Posts: 28,134
    #6

    Re: time expressions

    Quote Originally Posted by birdeen's call View Post
    What is wrong with this sentence if anything?
    Thirty years ago I would have regarded it as a horrible Americanism. Today I probably say it myself, though I tend to prefer the 'evenings' at the start of the sentence.
    The Oxford ALD accepts it as an adverb "(especially AmE)".
    So, there's nothing wrong with it, in my opinion.

    • Member Info
      • Native Language:
      • Russian
      • Home Country:
      • Russian Federation
      • Current Location:
      • Ukraine

    • Join Date: Oct 2010
    • Posts: 994
    #7

    Re: time expressions

    I'd like to draw a conclusion
    When talking about periods of time in general, we can use either of these phrases:

    on Monday = on Mondays
    in the evening = in the evenings = evenings
    on Monday evening = on Monday evenings
    at the weekend = on the weekend = at the weekends

    Can I say 'at weekends" omitting 'the' ?

    on workdays

    Is everything correct?
    Thank you.

  5. 5jj's Avatar
    • Member Info
      • Native Language:
      • British English
      • Home Country:
      • England
      • Current Location:
      • Czech Republic

    • Join Date: Oct 2010
    • Posts: 28,134
    #8

    Re: time expressions

    Quote Originally Posted by Verona_82 View Post
    I'd like to draw a conclusion
    When talking about periods of time in general, we can use either of these phrases:

    on Monday = on Mondays
    in the evening = in the evenings = evenings
    on Monday evening = on Monday evenings
    at the weekend = on the weekend = at the weekends

    Can I say 'at weekends" omitting 'the' ? Yes ........on workdays Yes
    All correct.
    I have underlined my personal preferences, but that is all they are.

    • Member Info
      • Native Language:
      • Russian
      • Home Country:
      • Russian Federation
      • Current Location:
      • Ukraine

    • Join Date: Oct 2010
    • Posts: 994
    #9

    Re: time expressions

    I was thinking about time expressions today as I had to combine some of them. However, it wasn't easy.

    (1a) The roads are ususally congested on weekday evenings
    (1b) The roads are usually congested on weekdays in the evening
    (2a) The roads are usually congested at (the) weekends in the evening
    (2b) The roads are usually congested in the evenings at (the) weekends

    How would a native speaker express this idea?

  6. apex2000's Avatar
    • Member Info
      • Native Language:
      • English
      • Home Country:
      • UK
      • Current Location:
      • Wales

    • Join Date: Nov 2005
    • Posts: 785
    #10

    Re: time expressions

    Quote Originally Posted by Verona_82 View Post
    I was thinking about time expressions today as I had to combine some of them. However, it wasn't easy.

    (1a) The roads are ususally congested on weekday evenings
    (1b) The roads are usually congested on weekdays in the evening
    (2a) The roads are usually congested at (the) weekends in the evening
    (2b) The roads are usually congested in the evenings at (the) weekends

    How would a native speaker express this idea?
    All four are in common use. We might also say that the roads are frequently congested, especially in/during the evenings.

Page 1 of 2 1 2 LastLast

Similar Threads

  1. expressions with time
    By ostap77 in forum Ask a Teacher
    Replies: 1
    Last Post: 12-Oct-2010, 13:18
  2. Prepositions before time expressions
    By Deepurple in forum Ask a Teacher
    Replies: 6
    Last Post: 21-May-2009, 02:46
  3. time expressions
    By henryh in forum Ask a Teacher
    Replies: 1
    Last Post: 11-Mar-2009, 05:29
  4. frequency words, expressions of time
    By mas94010 in forum Linguistics
    Replies: 21
    Last Post: 20-Oct-2003, 22:14
  5. Apostrophes and Time Expressions
    By markbarnard in forum General Language Discussions
    Replies: 3
    Last Post: 06-Mar-2003, 18:06

Bookmarks

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •