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    #1

    you'd think

    Dear all,

    I can't get the exact meaning of the expression "you'd think" in the following context, and actually in general

    DREW Wait a second. You just can't fire me just like this.

    MR. WICK Oh, I'm afraid I can. Here's your pink slip, Carey.

    CAREY I've been here for fifteen years. Doesn't that count for anything?

    MR. WICK You'd think.


    (There was laughter after that)


    Thanks a lot.

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    #2

    Re: you'd think

    Firstly it is not good English. It is a line that appears in TV drama a lot.
    It is offhand, uncaring. The underlying meaning in this case is: you'd think it should but not in your case.

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    #3

    Re: you'd think

    Why would you say it's not good English? There is nothing grammatically wrong with "you'd think."

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    #4

    Re: you'd think

    Why would you say it is, if that is what you are implying?

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    #5

    Re: you'd think

    Quote Originally Posted by apex2000 View Post
    Firstly it is not good English. It is a line that appears in TV drama a lot.
    It is offhand, uncaring. The underlying meaning in this case is: you'd think it should but not in your case.

    Thanks a lot for considering the context

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    #6

    Re: you'd think

    "You'd think" is a contraction for "you would think."

    Now I ask you again. What is not "good English" about it?
    Last edited by SoothingDave; 04-Feb-2011 at 19:32.

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    #7

    Re: you'd think

    You would think what?
    If you think that you need to explain contractions I really am puzzled.

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    #8

    Re: you'd think

    Quote Originally Posted by apex2000 View Post
    You would think what?
    If you think that you need to explain contractions I really am puzzled.
    Soothing Dave can't know what you consider good English. You could consider contractions bad English, why not--you didn't use a single contraction in this thread.

    I don't understand what is wrong with "you'd think". You ask, "You would think what?" but you explained it yourself in post #2. It's a case of ellipsis, isn't it?

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    #9

    Re: you'd think

    What "you would think" is obvious from the context. I don't think "good English" requires that we always belabor the point.

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    #10

    Re: you'd think

    So let me pose another thought.
    Would either of you frequently say 'you would think'?
    This is not a case of belabouring a point; in this case it is whether or not it is good English, which for clarification is not the same as good grammar.
    You would think so; would you think so?
    Compare, say, d'you think, and d'you think?
    I would reject the first because it is unfinished but I would say yes to the second (at least I hope that I do).
    We were asked two questions and I dealt with both in the way that I did because we are trying to encourage good English.

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