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    #1

    would be doing

    Hi,

    What is the difference between these two sentences?


    I would be leaving school.
    I would be leaving the school.


    Thanks a lot

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    #2

    Re: would be doing

    Leaving school means finishing your education.

    Leaving the school means walking out of the building.

    Rover

  1. 5jj's Avatar
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    #3

    Re: would be doing

    However, leaving school could also mean walking out of the building. It depends on (how many times do we have to say this?) context.
    Last edited by 5jj; 06-Feb-2011 at 12:56. Reason: typo

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    #4

    Re: would be doing

    Quote Originally Posted by fivejedjon View Post
    However, leaving school could also mean walking out of the building. It depends on (how many tmes do we have to say this?) context.
    ♥♦♣♠ NOT A TEACHER ♥♦♣♠
    Not the building as such to me; the meaning is rather that of finishing classes that one has in a building such as a school, which is a lot to do with the building itself though.

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    #5

    Re: would be doing

    Quote Originally Posted by engee30 View Post
    ♥♦♣♠ NOT A TEACHER ♥♦♣♠
    Not the building as such to me; the meaning is rather that of finishing classes that one has in a building such as a school, which is a lot to do with the building itself though.
    I wrote (new emphasis added), "However, leaving school could also mean walking out of the building. It depends on (how many times do we have to say this?) context".

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    #6

    Re: would be doing

    Since this topic seems quite relevant to my question, I'd like to post it here: if a student attended college, and not school, would it be appropriate for him/her to say leave college in the same contexts?

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    #7

    Re: would be doing

    Quote Originally Posted by engee30 View Post
    [...]if a student attended college, and not school, would it be appropriate for him/her to say leave college in the same contexts?
    Yes.

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    #8

    Re: would be doing

    Quote Originally Posted by fivejedjon View Post
    However, leaving school could also mean walking out of the building. It depends on (how many times do we have to say this?) context.
    Here is the quote from Rover:

    Leaving school means finishing your education.

    Leaving the school means walking out of the building.

    Now let me answer your question, five:

    I must say sorry if I really offend you. But obviously it has been a long time for me not to do such things like saying sorry to someone. I am not as aggressive as before.

    I got this question when I went over my notes, I was not sure about its correctness. But after reading Rover's answer, I feel much better.

    As an English learner, I don't want you to get me wrong; Silver is a stubborn person, he never gives enough context. But the truth is that I don't want to stand in your way when I know that you are trying to help me.

    You said "leaving school could also mean walking out of a building", this was what I didn't realize, nor would I offer the context to complicate my question. I think you all are very busy everyday, why the heck do I need to bother you with something that seems unnecessary?

    If you really don't like my style, I only can say I am sorry. And if you don't mind, would you be so kind as to tell me that the situation when "leaving school could also mean walking out of a building"? I am always grateful of what you've done to help me.

    Sorry

    Silver

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    #9

    Re: would be doing

    Hi, Silver.

    I know I'm not the addressee of your last post, but let me say what I think about it.

    I agree that sometimes context may be an obstacle. Too much focus may make us lose generality. There is another English forum on the internet, which I left because of this--the rules were too strict for my needs.

    But you see, a complete lack of focus isn't good either. It may be impossible or very difficult to answer a question that is too general. Note that all teachers here are volunteers and can't be expected to spend a whole day thinking about all possible implications of one sentence.

    It could be a good solution if you stated your expectations and the origins of your questions clearly in your posts. For example:

    Quote Originally Posted by Silverobama
    I was thinking about the difference between "the school" and "school". I thought, "What would be the difference between, 'leaving school' and 'leaving the school'?" I came up with the following sentences. I don't have any context, because I made these sentences myself. Could you please discuss the possible meanings? I know it may be difficult but any guidance will be appreciated.
    Now, a reader knows what they are dealing with. They know there's no point in pushing you for context. If they feel like responding, they will respond.

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    #10

    Re: would be doing

    Quote Originally Posted by Silverobama View Post
    I must say sorry if I really offend you.
    you don't offend me by asking about a response of mine. My answers may be unclear or even wrong. If in doubt, ask.
    You said "leaving school could also mean walking out of a building", [...]And if you don't mind, would you be so kind as to tell me that the situation when "leaving school could also mean walking out of a building"?
    Before I go any further, let me stress that I used the word could to imply that it was theoretically possible; I did not intend to suggest that Rover's answer was incorrect.

    Now, consider these three sentences to see how the words can have different meanings.

    1. In England you can leave school at 16, but most people these days stay on untill they are 18. = finish one's education

    2. Unless I have a department meeting, I leave school at 4.30. = finish my day's work / leave the building / set off home.

    3. The traffic is fairly heavy until five o'clock, but if I leave school after that, I can be home by six. leave the building /set off home.

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