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    #1

    Thumbs down Newspaper Headlines

    Hello

    I was cleaning my room and I found lot's of newspapers that I bought in England last year. I bought them to study as my teacher said I could learn lot's of new words.

    I am finding it very hard to understand the grammar point of these sentence. meaning of the headlines is ok. It's about Mr Brown calling women something bad... I think I understand this but what is grammar point or meaning of the headlines

    Day of Disaster
    Brown Toast
    Demonised: the granny who dared to utter the i-word

    Please help me and thank you
    Last edited by helpmeplease; 06-Feb-2011 at 18:13. Reason: sent by mistake. Now its ok

  1. bhaisahab's Avatar
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    #2

    Re: Newspaper Headlines

    Quote Originally Posted by helpmeplease View Post
    Hello

    I was cleaning my room and I found lot's of newspapers that I bought in England last year. I bought them to study as my teacher said I could learn lot's of new words.

    I am finding it very hard to understand the grammar point of these sentence. meaning of the headlines is ok. It's about Mr Brown calling women something bad... I think I understand this but what is grammar point or meaning of the headlines

    Day of Disaster
    Brown Toast
    Demonised: the granny who dared to utter the i-word

    Please help me and thank you
    Newspaper headline are often written that way, to make them more "punchy" and to save space, the first one could be "A/The Day of Disaster", the second, "Mr Brown is toast", and the third, "The granny who dared to use the i-word has been demonised".

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    #3

    Re: Newspaper Headlines

    Quote Originally Posted by helpmeplease View Post
    Hello

    I was cleaning my room and I found lot's of newspapers that I bought in England last year. I bought them to study as my teacher said I could learn lot's of new words.

    I am finding it very hard to understand the grammar point of these sentence. meaning of the headlines is ok. It's about Mr Brown calling women something bad... I think I understand this but what is grammar point or meaning of the headlines

    Day of Disaster
    Brown Toast
    Demonised: the granny who dared to utter the i-word

    Please help me and thank you

    ***** NOT A TEACHER *****


    Helpmeplease,


    (1) Moderator Bhasaihab has given you and me an excellent
    answer. Since I love newspapers, may I make a few comments?

    (2) As the moderator said, "Brown toast" is a short way to

    say "Brown is toast." In English, if we say that someone is

    toast, that means that her hopes are finished. Mr. Gordon Brown

    was running in an election. Then he said something (which I shall

    discuss below). That one word -- according to some observers --

    finished/destroyed his chances of winning. His campaign was

    toast!!! For example, if you make your boss angry, maybe someone

    will took at you and say: You're toast. That is, your job here is

    over. You will be fired. I googled and found out how one British

    newspaper explained it: "She went out to get bread and came

    back with Brown toast." Do you see how clever that was: comparing

    "bread" with "toast." What kind of toast? [Gordon] Brown toast!!!

    British newspapers are famous for such vivid writing.

    (3) Demonised: the granny who dared to utter the i-word.

    This 66-year-old lady was speaking with Prime Minister Brown.

    She mentioned the i-word. The i-word = immigration. In the

    United Kingdom (as in my country), immigration is a SUPER

    sensitive subject. Of course, nobody wants to hurt other people's

    feelings. So many people feel that it is not nice to discuss the matter.

    They refer to it as the i-word because they do not want to hurt

    people's feelings by using the complete word. Mr. Brown did not

    like what the lady said. He told some people that she was a "bigot" (a person who does not like people of other races).

    He thought he was speaking in private. He wasn't. His

    words were being recorded. And then the whole nation knew that he

    had criticized a granny (grandmother type of woman) only because she

    had mentioned the i-word.

    (4) Here in the United States, if we are afraid to say a particular

    word, we just say the first letter + "word."

    ***** NOT A TEACHER *****
    Last edited by TheParser; 06-Feb-2011 at 19:43.

  2. apex2000's Avatar
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    #4

    Re: Newspaper Headlines

    Quote Originally Posted by helpmeplease View Post
    Hello

    I was cleaning my room and I found lot's of newspapers that I bought in England last year. I bought them to study as my teacher said I could learn lot's of new words.
    You also appear to be having trouble with the apostrophe.
    A lot of newspapers, or lots (plural) of newspapers, and a lot of new words, or, lots of words.
    Do not confuse the plural with the possessive.

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    #5

    Re: Newspaper Headlines

    Thank you so much for your fast and kind reply.

    I can now understand the meaning of these headlines.

    Grammar I am not sure though.

    A day of disaster (I think this is a noun phrase)

    Mr Brown is toast (I think this is a Declarative Sentence)

    The granny who dared to use the i-word has been demonised (This is relative pronoun with Present Perfect Verb)

    Still don't understand grammar point of origional headlines though.

    Day of Disaster
    Brown Toast
    Demonised: the granny who dared to utter the i-word

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    #6

    Re: Newspaper Headlines

    You are not a teacher? is it true? you really helped me so I must say thank you.

    I can now understand the meaning of these headlines because of you.

    Grammar I am not sure though.

    A day of disaster (I think this is a noun phrase)

    Mr Brown is toast (I think this is a Declarative Sentence)

    The granny who dared to use the i-word has been demonised (This is relative pronoun with Present Perfect Verb)

    Still don't understand grammar point of origional headlines though.

    Day of Disaster
    Brown Toast
    Demonised: the granny who dared to utter the i-word

    Thank you for your kindness

  3. Raymott's Avatar
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    #7

    Re: Newspaper Headlines

    Quote Originally Posted by helpmeplease View Post
    Still don't understand grammar point of origional headlines though.

    Day of Disaster
    Brown Toast
    Demonised: the granny who dared to utter the i-word

    Thank you for your kindness
    I understand a "grammar point" to be a point of grammar that is currently being discussed or learnt. Newspaper headlines don't have grammar points.
    Can you rephrase your question?

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    #8

    Re: Newspaper Headlines

    Sorry my English is bad. Try again.

    A day of disaster (is this noun phrase?)

    Mr Brown is toast (Is this Declarative Sentence?)

    The granny who dared to use the i-word has been demonised (Is this relative pronoun with Present Perfect Verb)

    If bove is meaning but headlines are this -

    Day of Disaster
    Brown Toast
    Demonised: the granny who dared to utter the i-word

    How can I explain difference?

    Thank you

  4. Raymott's Avatar
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    #9

    Re: Newspaper Headlines

    Quote Originally Posted by helpmeplease View Post
    Sorry my English is bad. Try again.

    A day of disaster (is this noun phrase?)

    Mr Brown is toast (Is this Declarative Sentence?)

    The granny who dared to use the i-word has been demonised (Is this relative pronoun with Present Perfect Verb)

    If bove is meaning but headlines are this -

    Day of Disaster
    Brown Toast
    Demonised: the granny who dared to utter the i-word

    How can I explain difference?

    Thank you
    No, you can't parse a headline (with rules). You often have to guess. "Brown Toast" could indeed be about brown toast. That's why there are so many jokes about ambiguous headlines, like "British Left Waffles on Falklands".
    In many cases, you have to read the article to find out what the headline means.

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    #10

    Re: Newspaper Headlines

    "British Left Waffles on Falklands".
    That's a good one, Raymott.

    Rover

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