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    #1

    Exempt vs. exempted

    "Such agreements are unlikely to be exempt under Article 81(3)."

    Shouldn't "exempt" be "exempted"?

    Thanks!

  1. 5jj's Avatar
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    #2

    Re: Exempt vs. exempted

    Quote Originally Posted by Jasmin165 View Post
    "Such agreements are unlikely to be exempt under Article 81(3)."

    Shouldn't "exempt" be "exempted"?
    Probably not. It seems that Article 81(3) may have exempted them. They are now exempt under that article.

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    #3

    Re: Exempt vs. exempted

    Quote Originally Posted by Jasmin165 View Post
    "Such agreements are unlikely to be exempt under Article 81(3)."

    Shouldn't "exempt" be "exempted"?

    Thanks!
    The word "exempt" is used correctly in this sentence as it refers to the future,....."to be exempt".

    The fact that "exempted" is in the past form, it cannot be used.

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    #4

    Re: Exempt vs. exempted

    Quote Originally Posted by slim-shen View Post
    The word "exempt" is used correctly in this sentence as it refers to the future,....."to be exempt".

    The fact that "exempted" is in the past form, it cannot be used.
    Well, no. We could be referring to an Article in a treaty that is yet to be ratified. Exempted (past participle/third form) is possible then:

    Such agreements will be exempted.
    Such agreements are unlikely to be exempted.

    It's really a question of whether we are interested in the state of their being exempt or the process by which they were/are/will be exempted (passive).

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    #5

    Re: Exempt vs. exempted

    This is an unusual case of the adjective not deriving from the past participle, where the action leads to the state. Normally, the words are the same:
    "We painted the door - The door is painted."
    "I washed the dog - The dog is washed."
    "They've eaten the food. The food is eaten" etc

    But this is not invariable:
    "Such agreements are unlikely to be legal/legalised under Article 81(3). - Different meanings. legalised (p.p.)-> legal (adj)
    "The door will not be open/opened during the concert." opened (p.p.)-> open (adj)
    etc.

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    #6

    Re: Exempt vs. exempted

    Quote Originally Posted by fivejedjon View Post
    Well, no. We could be referring to an Article in a treaty that is yet to be ratified. Exempted (past participle/third form) is possible then:

    Such agreements will be exempted.
    Such agreements are unlikely to be exempted.

    It's really a question of whether we are interested in the state of their being exempt or the process by which they were/are/will be exempted (passive).
    So, in other words, "exempt" and "exempted" would both be correct in the example I provided. "Exempt" would emphasize the state of being exempt, while "exempted" would stress the process of exemption.

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    #7

    Re: Exempt vs. exempted

    Quote Originally Posted by Jasmin165 View Post
    So, in other words, "exempt" and "exempted" would both be correct in the example I provided. "Exempt" would emphasize the state of being exempt, while "exempted" would stress the process of exemption.
    Yes.

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