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    #1

    to vs ing

    I am using one grammar book where it is written out that "imagine" is included into a list of verbs which are used with ing form and is excluded from a list of verbs which can be followed by an infinitive. However there is a reference in another book showing that "imagine" can be used with both "to" and "ing form". Please explain

  1. engee30's Avatar
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    #2

    Thumbs down Re: to vs ing

    Quote Originally Posted by olegv View Post
    I am using one grammar book where it is written out that "imagine" is included into a list of verbs which are used with ing form and is excluded from a list of verbs which can be followed by an infinitive. However there is a reference in another book showing that "imagine" can be used with both "to" and "ing form". Please explain
    ♥♦♣♠ NOT A TEACHER ♥♦♣♠
    As far as I know, imagine can only be followed by an -ing form.

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    #3

    Re: to vs ing

    engee30 is right, in which book did you see that it can be followed by "to"?

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    #4

    Re: to vs ing

    Quote Originally Posted by olegv View Post
    I am using one grammar book where it is written out that "imagine" is included into a list of verbs which are used with ing form and is excluded from a list of verbs which can be followed by an infinitive. However there is a reference in another book showing that "imagine" can be used with both "to" and "ing form". Please explain
    The verb imagine among others (admit, allow, consider, forbid, permit, require) can indeed be followed by either a to-infinitive OR a gerund, but not directly followed. Its object intervenes:


    • imagine + object + to-infinitive OR a gerund
      • What do you imagine someone to be like?
      • What do you imagine someone being like?

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    #5

    Re: to vs ing

    Thank you for your comments. In response to your question about which book I am referring to, the book is "Advanced Language Practice" by Muichael Vince. Let me cite the relevant para:" 4. Imagine

    With an object and to:

    I imagined the castle to be haunted.

    With -ing: An object is also possible.

    I couldn't imagine (her) living in a place like that.

    With that + clause it means suppose:

    I imagine that you'd like a cup of tea after your long journey!
    "

    After, in an activities section, there is an exercise where the first point is used as example and is: "a) I never imagine the mountaines to be/being so high?". The correct answer is mared as "to be" - it appears very confusing, to be frank. Thank you very much for your further explanation or comments.


    Nothing more is mentioned as to the usage of imagine plus to/ing form.

    In other grammar book named "Longman Advanced Learners' Grammar by Mark Foley and Diane Hall", which in my opinion is the most comprehensive and practical one, it is noted: "Certain verbs (see box below) can be followed by an -ing form, but not by an infinitive. With some of these verbs (marked * in the box below) we can also put an object before the ing-form. Compare: Can you imagine wearing that dreass (verb+-ing form) Can you imagibe Jemima wearing that dress! (verb + object+-ing form)."
    Immeditely below the authors stipulated a list of verbs which can be followed by ing form only. "Imagine" is among those verbs marked with *.
    Nothing more is noted about the usage of imagine in the context of to/ing usage.

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    #6

    Re: to vs ing

    Саn you please help me with the questions I raised?

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    #7

    Re: to vs ing

    Quote Originally Posted by olegv View Post
    Thank you for your comments. In response to your question about which book I am referring to, the book is "Advanced Language Practice" by Muichael Vince. Let me cite the relevant para:" 4. Imagine

    With an object and to:

    I imagined the castle to be haunted.

    With -ing: An object is also possible.

    I couldn't imagine (her) living in a place like that.

    With that + clause it means suppose:

    I imagine that you'd like a cup of tea after your long journey!
    "

    After, in an activities section, there is an exercise where the first point is used as example and is: "a) I never imagine[d?] the mountaines to be/being so high?". The correct answer is mared as "to be" - it appears very confusing, to be frank. Thank you very much for your further explanation or comments.

    What is the source of your confusion?
    The first example uses "to be"; you say that the activity question is an exercise on the first example, and the answer is "to be". Where's the inconsistency?


    Nothing more is mentioned as to the usage of imagine plus to/ing form.

    In other grammar book named "Longman Advanced Learners' Grammar by Mark Foley and Diane Hall", which in my opinion is the most comprehensive and practical one, it is noted: "Certain verbs (see box below) can be followed by an -ing form, but not by an infinitive. With some of these verbs (marked * in the box below) we can also put an object before the ing-form. Compare: Can you imagine wearing that dreass (verb+-ing form) Can you imagibe Jemima wearing that dress! (verb + object+-ing form)."
    Immeditely below the authors stipulated a list of verbs which can be followed by ing form only. "Imagine" is among those verbs marked with *.
    Nothing more is noted about the usage of imagine in the context of to/ing usage.
    This has already been explained by the others. Did you read lauralie2's post?
    Both of your texts are right.
    'Imagine' can be followed directly by an '-ing' form: "Imagine doing that!" Right
    'Imagine' can not be followed directly by a 'to' form: * "Imagine to do that!" Wrong
    'Imagine' can be used with, but not directly followed by, a 'to' form: "I imagine her to be quite pretty, from the description";
    Anything can be followed by anything if you put enough words and punctuation between them. The second book is listing verbs that cannot be followed directly by the 'to' form.

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    #8

    Re: to vs ing

    Thank you for this. Please help me further. The first book expressly refers to the following sentences as correct ones - Can you imagine wearing that dress. Can you imagine Jemima wearing that dress.

    The second book restricts the sentence "I never imagined the mountains to be/being so high" just to "to be so high". If one looks at the structures of the sentences: Can you imagine Jemima wearing that dress and I never imagined the mountains being so hight, it appears that both structures are the same. Thus, it is not clear for me why the answer "being so high" is wrong? Thanks.

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    #9

    Re: to vs ing

    Quote Originally Posted by olegv View Post
    Thank you for this. Please help me further. The first book expressly refers to the following sentences as correct ones - Can you imagine wearing that dress. Can you imagine Jemima wearing that dress.
    That's right.

    The second book restricts the sentence "I never imagined the mountains to be/being so high" just to "to be so high". If one looks at the structures of the sentences: Can you imagine Jemima wearing that dress and I never imagined the mountains being so hight, it appears that both structures are the same. Thus, it is not clear for me why the answer "being so high" is wrong? Thanks.
    I don't think it's wrong. However, "to be so high" is better in this sentence.
    There's a subtle difference.
    If the sentence were, "I never imagined him to be/being so stupid", I would choose "being" as being more common. But both could be correct. The "to be" version implies that he is always stupid; he's inherently stupid. He is stupid, and I never imagined that.

    The "being" form means that he has been stupid; he has done something stupid. He's not inherently stupid, but he's behaved stupidly. It's the same difference as between, "You are stupid" (permanent) and "You are being stupid" (temporary).

    Now, if you look at the mountain example, "to be" implies permanency, while "being" tends to have this implication of temporary highness. "The mountain is being high" - which is absurd.

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    #10

    Re: to vs ing

    Quote Originally Posted by Raymott View Post
    Anything can be followed by anything if you put enough words and punctuation between them.
    Thank you for that.

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