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    #1

    increase in (?) crime rate

    "rate" is a countable noun.

    Therefore, which of the sentences below are correct?

    1. The increase in a crime rate is in direct proportion to the number of unemployed.

    2. The increase in crime rate is in direct proportion to the number of unemployed.

    3. The increase in crime rates are in direct proportion to the number of unemployed.

    Thank you very much indeed.

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    #2

    Re: increase in (?) crime rate

    Quote Originally Posted by panicmonger View Post
    "rate" is a countable noun.

    Therefore, which of the sentences below are correct?

    1. The increase in a crime rate is in direct proportion to the number of unemployed.

    2. The increase in crime rate is in direct proportion to the number of unemployed.

    3. The increase in crime rates are in direct proportion to the number of unemployed.

    Thank you very much indeed.
    You missed, 4., 5. "The increase in the crime rate/s is/are in direct proportion to the number of unemployed."
    They could all be right in the appropriate context. 2. is probably the most useful and generic.

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    #3

    Re: increase in (?) crime rate

    I would say "the increase in the crime rate..." (Or rates, if you had different figures for different categories of crime.)

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    #4

    Re: increase in (?) crime rate

    Quote Originally Posted by Raymott View Post
    2. is probably the most useful and generic.
    In no. 2, there is no article before the countable noun 'rate', but it is still grammatical. Could you tell me the reason why it is correct?

    Thank you again.

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    #5

    Re: increase in (?) crime rate

    Quote Originally Posted by panicmonger View Post
    In no. 2, there is no article before the countable noun 'rate', but it is still grammatical. Could you tell me the reason why it is correct?

    Thank you again.
    It's difficult to explain why something is correct. Why do you think it's incorrect?
    "Crime rate" doesn't have to be countable. You could consider it an abstract noun. There are a lot of places where an article is not necessary.
    "The increase in temperature is due to ... "
    "The increase in reading among 5 year olds ..."
    "The increase in volume of the dam ..."
    ...

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    #6

    Re: increase in (?) crime rate

    Quote Originally Posted by Raymott View Post
    It's difficult to explain why is correct. Why do you think it's incorrect?
    "Crime rate" doesn't have to be countable. You could consider it an abstract noun. There are a lot of places where an article is not necessary.
    "The increase in temperature is due to ... "
    "The increase in reading among 5 year olds ..."
    "The increase in volume of the dam ..."
    ...
    I considered it wrong because there is a rule that a determiner must be placed before any countable noun, no matter what contexts, we cannot leave a countable noun with no reference with it.

    But after reading your reply, I think there is an exception to this rule.
    Maybe when we emphasize on the type of noun but not its quantity, we can use countable nouns on their own.

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