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    #1

    Plural

    The sentences below are from a book written by two Britons.

    "Under the Italian legal system, certain categories of case could be appealed from the magistratesí courts while other categories could not."

    "The kinds of agreement which threaten market integration are those which partition the common market, thereby preventing goods from moving freely throughout the Member States."

    I would've wrtitten "cases" and "agreements." I'd like to know if it's common in British English to use the singular in such constructions.

    Thanks!

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    #2

    Re: Plural

    Both of these refer to particular types of case and agreement. If you use the plural that could infer more than one type.
    For example, we could mention all divorce cases where one adopted child is involved - one particular type, whereas there are many differences in divorce cases. In the other example it is only those agreements which threaten market integration and they all fall into one category. There may be hundreds of cases/agreements but they all meet the same condition and become one class.

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    #3

    Re: Plural

    I'd use the plural.

    It says "categories" and "kinds," not "category" and "kind."

    Contrast "she is the kind of girl you want to take home to mother" to "there are all kinds of cars."

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    #4

    Re: Plural

    Quote Originally Posted by SoothingDave View Post
    I'd use the plural.

    It says "categories" and "kinds," not "category" and "kind."

    Contrast "she is the kind of girl you want to take home to mother" to "there are all kinds of cars."
    I think this is a matter of British English vs. American English. A North American would use the plural.

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    #5

    Re: Plural

    Quote Originally Posted by SoothingDave View Post
    I'd use the plural.

    It says "categories" and "kinds," not "category" and "kind."

    Contrast "she is the kind of girl you want to take home to mother" to "there are all kinds of cars."
    So, if there is only one type of case that can be appealed?
    There may be more than one category but they all come down to the same type of case.
    Say, for example, there are three categories of burglary but they all fit into the one type of case - burglary - then we have just the one type of case to appeal, and none others. Violent cases involving burglary are not included; burglary committed by a member of the same family and so on. There are many differences regarding burglary but only those that fall into type a, b and c are essentially the same and that type can be appealed?

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    #6

    Re: Plural

    Quote Originally Posted by apex2000 View Post
    So, if there is only one type of case that can be appealed?
    There may be more than one category but they all come down to the same type of case.
    Say, for example, there are three categories of burglary but they all fit into the one type of case - burglary - then we have just the one type of case to appeal, and none others. Violent cases involving burglary are not included; burglary committed by a member of the same family and so on. There are many differences regarding burglary but only those that fall into type a, b and c are essentially the same and that type can be appealed?
    I see what you are saying, but I don't read it that way. You seem to be defining "case" as an abstraction derived from different types of categories. You are looking at the different categories and deciding that several different categories fall into one classification of "case."

    I think that "case" refers to a particular individual's record of proceedings before the court. There are many different cases before the court. You can classify the various cases into categories depending on the underlying crime. of those categories, some of them qualify for an appeal.

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    #7

    Re: Plural

    Not so. I am replying to the OP in the way that we use case in such circumstances. As you will have noted the extract is taken from a book by British authors; I accept that this use may not be normal in the US.

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